Poetic Literature: the 10 Plagues

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  • Topic: Plagues of Egypt, Nile, Moses
  • Pages : 2 (852 words )
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  • Published : April 2, 2011
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God in this time period and now is a very powerful being. He has the knowledge of what is good and what is evil. Pharaoh in the book of Exodus tests God’s patience and power by continuing to deceive him as well as Moses, and Aaron. In this paper I plan to compare and contrast the ten plagues in the bible, Exodus 7:14-12:36 with Psalms 78:44-51 and 105:28-36 as well as explain how the authors of each psalm view the story of the plagues. In Exodus, it speaks about how the Pharaoh is unyielding to letting the Egyptian slaves go free so that they can worship to God. God initially had send Moses, who was made like God to the Pharaoh, and Aaron, Moses’ prophet, to warn Pharaoh to let God’s people go. Each and every time this request was asked of Pharaoh, he would lie about freeing his slaves, then, harden his heart and change his mind. This made God very angry and this is how the plagues began. The first plague started with the River Nile being turned into blood. This was God’s initial idea of getting Pharaoh to do what he wants and by removing the source of water would surely get his attention. However, that was not the case and the Pharaoh’s heart hardened. This pattern between God, Moses, Aaron, and the Pharaoh continued throughout nine more plagues after the first. The plagues that occurred after the Nile River turning into blood were frogs, gnats, flies, livestock/pestilence, boils, hail, locusts, darkness, and finally the death of the first born of every living being and animal in Egypt. The final plague is what we now know as Passover. I noticed in the first Psalm account of the ten plagues (Ps. 78:44-51), only seven of the ten plagues were mentioned. It started with turning the river into blood, followed by a swarm of flies, frogs, then locusts, hail, the killing of livestock, and finally the killing of the firstborn of every human and animal of Egypt. This psalm only has eight stanzas and if you notice the plagues are not in the same order as the ones in the...
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