Poe Decoder

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 107
  • Published : November 29, 2000
Open Document
Text Preview
Poe Decoder

An Analysis of Adgar Allan Poe's
Psychological Thriller

Outline

I. Prelude
II. Brief introduction to Adgar Allan Poe
1.1. Allan Poe's Life
2.2. Allan Poe's Works and Literary Achievement
III. Adgar Allan Poe -- A Post-Gothic Writer
1.1. Gothic Introduction
2.2. Analysis of Two Horror
1)1) The Fall of the House of Usher
a)a) Setting
b)b) Characters
c)c) Point of View
2)2) The Masque of the Red Death
a)a) Setting
b)b) Characters
c)c) Point of View
IV. The Symbolism in Allan Poe's Works
1. Symbolism Introduction
2. Analysis of two horrors
1)1) The Fall of the House of Usher
a)a) Style and Interpretation
b)b) Theme
2)2) The Masque of the Red Death
a)a) Style and Interpretation
b)b) Theme
V. Finale

I. Prelude
"During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was --but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit." -- The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe

Within the lines of the opening of The Fall Of The House Of Usher, as a result of Poe's imagery, we are aware of a sense of death and decay. Gothic is the ambience.
II. Brief Introduction to Adgar Allan Poe
1. Allan Poe's Life
Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in January 1809, the second son of traveling actors. Edgar, split up from his elder bother and younger sister, was taken into the household of a Virginian tobacco merchant, John Allan, whose name Poe adopted from 1824 onwards. Poe's relationship with his foster father was uneasy at the best of times and after a violent quarrel with his foster father over his choice of career, Poe left Virginia altogether and went to Boston. Poe was always very close to Mrs. Allan and it was her dying wish that her husband and foster son be reconciled. In 1830, living on a small allowance from Allan, Poe entered the military academy at West Point, but deliberately got himself dishonorably discharged in 1831. He lived with his aunt, Mrs. Clemms, in Baltimore, where he began to publish stories in magazines. When MS. Found in a Bottle won a short-story competition one of the judges helped secure him a job as an editor on the Southern Literary Messenger. In 1836 Poe married his thirteen-year-old cousin, Virginia Clemms. Much of his early work went unnoticed and it took until 1840 before Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque was published in two volumes. This included the famous story The Fall of the House of Usher. Plans for starting his own magazine did not lead too much and he continued to work as a magazine editor for various publications. His Tales and The Raven and Other Poems, published in 1845, did bring him some recognition but unfortunately it was not enough to sustain his family financially. Mrs. Clemms and Poe's wife Virginia nearly starved to death one winter. After his wife's death in 1847 Poe became increasingly unstable and his dependence on tempted suicide in 1848 and tragically died in 1849, five days after being found in a delirious and semi-conscious condition in Baltimore.

2. Allan Poe's Works and Literary Achievement
Edgar Allan Poe was mostly known for his poems and short tales and his literary criticism. His literary achievement was mostly on his short tales. The first short story collection, Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, contains 25 short tales includes Ms. Found in a Bottle, Berenice, Ligeia, Morella, The Fall of the House of Usher, William Wilson, etc. Later two short tales...
tracking img