Plessy V. Ferguson

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Unconstitutional

February 23, 2010
HIST 1320.260

In the two Supreme Court decisions of Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), had many similarities and differences in the final outcome. Both of the cases wanted to make it clear that it is unconstitutional for segregation in the States.

In the Supreme Court Case, Plessy v. Ferguson, and Brown v. Board of Education, they both dealt with the thirteenth and fourteenth amendments. These amendments merely stated that segregation was illegal. Both cases dealt with segregation in public accommodations. The Plessy v. Ferguson case dealt with segregation in railroad cars and Brown v. Board of Education dealt with segregation in public schools.

Congress in the Plessy v. Ferguson case stated that the thirteenth or fourteenth amendment were not gone against by the States. 1They stated that the Government and Legislation, and the Constitution could not put a stop to segregation, and that the “separate but equal” law will stay in place for a while.

In the Brown v. Board of Education case, Negroes wanted to attend the same school as white people. Compared to the Plessy v. Ferguson case, the Court in the Brown v. Board of Education case went with what was written in the Constitution and made it illegal for segregated schools. 2In the Plessy v. Ferguson case, they upheld the “separate but equal” doctrine.

The outcome of both of these cases affected many around the country. In the Plessy v. Ferguson case, people were believed that they were set free by the passing of the thirteenth and fourteenth amendments of the constitution, but little did they know, the government could always find a way around them. The “Separate but Equal” law took its way in the country. This allowed whites and coloreds to be separated without breaking the law. This is how they separated schools, restaurants, and even public transportation. Needless to say Homer Plessy lost the small battle in the court, but he...
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