Playstation 2 - Best-Selling Console of All-Time

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  • Topic: DualShock, PlayStation, PlayStation 2
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  • Published : April 3, 2013
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The PlayStation 2: Best-Selling Console of All Time

What is the best-selling console of all time? Most people will tell you the Wii or the Xbox 360 or the PS3 in terms of quality and experience. But if you're talking about sales numbers, if you're talking about the biggest number in the terms of sales and if you're talking unbiased figures, then the best-selling console of all time is the Sony PlayStation 2. Period. Nada. 'Nuff said. The Sony PlayStation 2 is a sixth generation console made by Sony and the successor to the PlayStation. It was announced in 1999 but not released until the year 2000, which gave the Dreamcast a headstart since Dreamcast came into the market on 1999. At the time, the sixth generation of consoles was kicking in very slowly so it was already a sign Sony had to made a successor. They wanted to get in on the action so the Dreamcast wouldn't make a lead. Sony had to rely on the fanbase of the original PlayStation to make sale for the PS2 so they had titles that continued on franchises from the PlayStation as well as the backwards compatibility for PS1 games. After all, the PlayStation sold over 100 million units in its lifetime so it was a good business call to build upon the foundation of what made the PlayStation a great console during the previous generation. The PS2 launched in Japan first on March 4, 2000 and into the rest of the world starting with USA on October 26, 2000. PS2's launch year in 2000 wasn't stellar that time but it did sell well, with Japan selling more than 980,000 units within days of launch. But the lineup of titles at launch were kind of lackluster. While there were some gems among the library, the games just didn't give the gamers what they wanted. Still, it did sell on the fact it played PS1 games and there were PlayStation fans. But that all changed when 2001 came. This was the year when the PS2 gained much momentum and this would see the end of the Dreamcast. This was the year when the PS2 had one heck of a blockbuster library. We'll go more on games later but always remember that 2001 was the year when the PS2 was finally catching up. (On an unrelated but similar note: The Nintendo 3DS had a similar situation. Launch sucked but it picked up momentum months later.) Just when the Dreamcast left the market, the PS2 had to face new rivals: Xbox and Gamecube. Xbox was the Microsoft's first foray into the world of video gaming while the Gamecube was the successor to the Nintendo 64. These two consoles were released near the end of 2001 so it was a fierce competition on the holidays in 2001. For the Spec-Maniacs out there, here's the specs on the original PS2, courtesy of Wikipedia: * CPU: 64-bit[3][4] "Emotion Engine" clocked at 294.912 MHz (299 MHz on newer versions), 10.5 million transistors * System memory: 32 MB Direct Rambus or RDRAM

* Memory bus Bandwidth: 3.2 gigabytes per second
* Main processor: MIPS R5900 CPU core, 64-bit, little endian (mipsel). * Coprocessor: FPU (Floating Point Multiply Accumulator × 1, Floating Point Divider × 1) * Vector Units: VU0 and VU1 (Floating Point Multiply Accumulator × 9, Floating Point Divider × 1), 32-bit, at 147.456 MHz. * VU0 typically used for polygon transformations optionally (under parallel or serial connection), physics and other gameplay based things * VU1 typically used for polygon transformations, lighting and other visual based calculations (Texture matrix able for 2 coordinates (UV/ST)[50]) * Parallel: Results of VU0/FPU sent as another display list via MFIFO (E.G. complex characters/vehicles/etc.) * Serial: Results of VU0/FPU sent to VU1 (via 3 methods) and can act as an optional geometry pre-processor that does all base work to update the scene every frame (E.G. camera, perspective, boning and laws of movement such as animations or physics) [51] * Floating Point Performance: 6.2 GFLOPS (single precision 32-bit floating point)...
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