Plastic Surgery

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Plastic Surgery: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

More than ever, millions of young adolescents are seeking out plastic surgery because the influence of the media. Teenagers are finding more imperfections with their body and are less and less satisfied with their appearance. President Scott Spear, MD, chief of plastic surgery says, "There's a common belief among the public that a large percentage of young adults and teens are having cosmetic surgery" (Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week). Despite the low percentage, young adults are considering getting face-lifts, breast implants, nose jobs, and liposuction. Advancements in technology have made it possible to receive these kinds of cosmetic procedures. Studies have shown that the media's influence has made it seem more acceptable within society. The pressure of being good-looking and maintaining a presentable look comes mainly from the media; television shows such as, I Want a Famous Face and The Swan attract individuals' vanity and desire to look perfect. MTV's I Want a Famous Face documents several young adults as they endure plastic surgery to look like their favorite celebrity. The show also makes a participants dream come true. A few of the contestants on the show want to be the next Julia Roberts or Britney Spears, but feel as if their physical appearance is holding back their stardom. The young adults will stop at nothing to look like their favorite superstar. The show documents the journey of twenty two-year old twins from Arizona, Mike and Matt. Their dream is to become a famous actor and attract women. Mike and Matt believe cosmetic surgery will help them boost their career.

Looking far from Brad Pitt, "Mike opted for a nose job, jaw implants, cheek implants, and a chin implant, setting him back twelve thousand dollars. Matt needed less work; a nose job and chin implant, at a cost of nine thousand dollars. Both also had the appearance of several teeth improved with pricey porcelain veneers" (Martin 1). After the surgery, the twins were ebullient with their end results. Although, Mike and Matt do not look like their idol, their physical appearance has improved. They are out more frequently because they have confidence and feel good about themselves. Another episode involved a young girl named Jeannette, who wanted to look like Kate Winslet. Jeannette already had some surgery done prior to the taping of the show. She had gastric bypass operation which helped her lose over one hundred pounds. However, Jeannette was still not satisfied with her appearance and wanted more done. To look like her idol, Jeannette underwent breast implants and a tummy tuck. I Want a Famous Face documented the surgery and her recovery. Before the surgery, Jeannette was insecure and had low self-esteem. After her recovery, Jeannette was satisfied with her new look and had no regrets about going through with the procedure.

The show is disturbing and truly appalling. The vast majority of its viewers are young adolescents, the show is sending out the wrong message by promoting plastic surgery to their viewers. Although, Mike, Matt, and Jeannette were happy with their results, other people with similar goals did not have a positive experience. An individual going into surgery must remember, "plastic surgery is an imperfect medical art and somewhat more complicated than one might assume, given its growing status" (Martin 2). Plastic surgeries can go wrong, for instance, "the story of one young man who, in an effort to resemble actor Ryan Philippe, borrowed five thousand dollars, chose the surgeon in the yellow pages who was closest to his home and had a nose job. He ended up with serious debt, a crooked nose, strange looking nostrils, low self-esteem and perpetual "squishy sounds" in his head" (Martin 2). It is outrageous that several individuals feel as if undergoing plastic surgery will help his/her chances of becoming a star. Another television show...
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