Planning and Control

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Table Of Content

1.Introduction Planning 3
2.Planning 3
2.1Goals3
2.2Plans4
2.2.1 The Planning Process5
3.Controlling the Management Process6
3.1Steps in Control6
3.2Areas of Control7
3.3Characteristics of Control7
4.Conclusion8

Reference

1.Introduction
Of the four fundamental tasks of management I have chosen to discuss the first and forth steps of management which are Planning and Controlling the management process. Planning is the basis for the rest of the management functions. The two core components in the planning stage are goals and planning process. Goals are the destination of the organisation, they indicate where the organization is heading, planning is the route mapped out to achieve the goals, the steps taken and the changes that are to be made in order for the organization to reach said goals Planning

Planning promotes co-ordination in the company where all departments work together to reach the pre-determined goal. Therefore teamwork and interdepartmental co-operation and communication are essential to work toward a primary goal. Management plan and formulate goals which are later used to assess control . The cost of the planning process may be time consuming. A lot of time and energy is needed to plan and strategize goals, this may cause a backlog in the management schedule. Planning may become rigid, not allowing any time to stray from the plans even the budget does not allow for it. The formal planning phase may also become a routine rather than viewed as a challenge thus the initial vigour and creatively may diminish over time. 1.1Goals

Goals are the starting point of any planning phase; they start from a mission statement and grow more specific. Organisations may have multiple goals the type of goal set is influenced by the level at which it is set. Goals are either stated publicly or not, this is determined by the degree of openness of the company. Official goals are declared publically to the media. Operative goals are private goals which are kept within the organization. Criteria for effective goals to improve chances of success achieving goals, managers should ensure that goals are not ambiguous. The SMART framework states that goals should be specific Goals should be

-Specific, it indicates what the goal relates to
-Measurable , result can be evaluated in quantifiable terms -Attainable, challenging yet realistic
-Relevant, relates to organisations mission and strategy
-Time Bound, specified time line to instil a sense of urgency A goal setting technique : Management by objectives is a technique whereby the individual and Management goals are integrated toward on primary goal.

Advantages of MBO
The efforts of managers and employees focus on attaining organisational goals The organisations performance can improve
Employees are motivated
Individual goals align with organisational goals

Disadvantages of MBO
Constant change in the environment can cause frequent change in organisational goals Poor relations between managers and employees reduce the effectiveness of MBO Operational goals may displace strategic goals

The organisational culture may discourage effective use of MBO MBO can result in too much paperwork

2.2 Plans
Plans are the ‘blueprints’ of achieving goals. It is an indicator of how goals are to be reached. It specifies resources to be used, the period in which the plans must be implemented. Managers consider many alternate plans of actions and choose one or a few plan of action that may be most feasible this includes External factors such as environment and market stability, strengths and weaknesses of the company and staff as a whole as It is best to work to the strengths of the company taking into account skills, patent, capital and the image of the...
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