Planned Change

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Session 4 Planning and implementing change
4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 The need for strategy Alternative approaches Process and politics in implementing change Planning and scheduling Towards successful implementation of change

ARer you have completed this session you should be able to: appreciate the importance of an implementation strategy in change management recognize when SIS and OD may be inappropriate approaches to planning and managing change, and consider alternative approaches such as 'turnarounds' and logical incrementalism' appreciate the risks inherent in the various approaches outlined be conversant with and able to deacribe a range of planning and scheduling teehniquea to assist the implementation of all types of change be sensitive to the wide range of factors that contribute to the successful

and uaeuwsful implementationof change and consider their


To complete your study of this session you wl need to refer to: il the Course Reader Managing Change

0.-4 -

the Learning D a y ir

This session turns to the skills of implementing one's preferred change strategy, If change is to be deemed successful, it must not simply be 'intmduceb; it must be made to 'stick' and stay in place. There are, alas, plenty of examples of major change programmes which have been carefully designed and initiated but which have not been sufficiently well implemented and carried through to prevent backaliding; new theories were espoused and new procedures adopted, but the underlying structures and cultures remained largely untouched. Much of the glamour of change management lies in grand ideas, schemes and aspirations. It is important, however, to learn the lessons of many of the failures of change and give due attention to the demanding, albeit less headline-eatching, business of implementation. The ideas about implementation considered in this session are relevant both to SIS and OD the main approaches to change we have been dealing with in t i course. hs However, given that suceeesful implementation depends on judging what is the most suitable approach in the Grst place, we briefly touch on two alternatives to our main strategies by way of contrast. Building on some of the concepts and skills you were developing in Unit 8, we also look at techniques you can use in the planning and scheduling of change activities. 4 a



4.1 The need for strategy
In this context a useful working definition of strategy is: A plan or scheme for realizing a series of changes which will bring you, or a work group, or an organization nearer to a set of predetermined goals or objectives. Note that there is a distinction between the tarm 'an implementation strategy' which we have stressed in this courae and the preoccupation of corporate plannera with what they refer to as the 'implementation of a strategy'. The latter invariably means long-term and large-scale em developments and changes, whereas the former (i.e. our t r )usually refers to a plan for making small to medium-de changes actually happen. You may remember from your work on Unit 9 that 'design implementation e strategies' is Step 8 of SIS. W considered three such strategies in Unit 9 pilot studies, parallel running and big bang and examined their respective pros and cons, including their costs and risks. In essence, the need for an implementation strategy arises because any process of change which has been conceived, designed, negotiated or, on occasions, imposed has to be made to work in the real world of the organization. Implementation strategy has to bridge the gap between the idea and the reality, and deal with new and distinctive sorts of problem that emerge when trying to make change stick.


Take one o the examples o change in your own organization which you f f examined earlier...
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