Pipeline Politics

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Pipeline Politics

By | July 2012
Page 1 of 17
The Great Energy Game
Oil and Gas Transit Politics in a purview of Central Asia

Contents
Central Asia and Its Strategic Importance3
Historical Development3
Russia’s Policy toward Central Asia in the Early 1990s3
Russia’s Policy toward Central Asia in the Late 1990s4
Russia’s Policy toward Central Asia under Putin5
American Interest in Central Asia6
Trans –Siberian Pipeline:7
Controversies surrounding the pipeline7
Russia-Ukraine gas dispute8
Mikhail Khodorkovsky: A victim of Oil Politics?8
Putin- Khodorkovsky Tussel9
Caspian Pipeline Consortium10
Baku-Novorossiysk Pipeline10
Baku –Supsa Pipeline11
Baku–Tbilisi–Ceyhan Pipeline12
Major issues raised by Turkey:12
Nabucco pipeline13
Issues related to Nabucco:13
South Stream and Nabucco: Head to Head14
Trans Caspian Gas Pipeline15
Changing games in Central Asia15
Nord Stream, TAP and TGI16
Blue Stream17
The TAPI Pipeline18
The IPI Pipeline18
The Oman-India Pipeline19
Role of Turkey21
The Turkish-EU problem21
References23

Central Asia and Its Strategic Importance
Following the collapse of the USSR, Russia was initially indifferent—borderline irritated, in fact—toward Central Asia. Not surprisingly, the region’s fledgling nations looked for help elsewhere as they ventured out of the Soviet nest. Russia soon became aware that it had lost a great deal of influence in the region, but in the latter half of Pres. Boris Yeltsin’s tenure, it regained very little clout since Central Asians perceived a disconnect between Russia’s “walk” and “talk.” The era of Yeltsin’s successor, Vladimir Putin, witnessed both enhanced focus and rigorous reassertion of Russian authority in the region. Historical Development

The term Central Asia typically refers to the five former Soviet Republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Russian tsars had conquered the region by the late nineteenth century. The Great Game...