Pied Beauty and Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

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Poetry Analysis
of 'Pied Beauty' and 'Composed Upon Wesminster Bridge'

Pied Beauty by Gerald Manley Hopkins and the Sonnet: Composed Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth, both show the beauty of life and the world around us. The only difference is that the petrarchan Sonnet written by Wordsworth is thanking God for the beauty of nature's landscapes and talking about the beautiful morning in London during the industrial revolution. The reduced version of a petrarchan Sonnet by Hopkins praises God for all the odd and strange things within nature. Both of the poems are written in a very peaceful tone and also make the mood very calm. When I read both these poems they make me understand how nature is unique in its own ways which can be very different from what we think of as beauty and there are various ways that you can look at it from.

Pied Beauty is a curtal or curtailed sonnet, this is a structure of poem that Hopkins came up with himself. A curtal sonnet is normally ten and a half or eleven lines long and so makes exactly three quarters of a petrarchan sonnet like Upon Westminster Bridge. Upon Westminster Bridge is made up of fourteen lines, which is divided into two; an octave which is made up of eight lines and a sestet which is made up of the remaining six lines. The two poems have completly different rhyme-schemes. Hopkins' poem's rhymes are easier to follow than Wordsworth's poem's though. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge's rhyme-scheme is: abbaabbacdcdcd and Pied Beauty's is: abcabcdbcdc. Both poems use literary devices like Similies. An example for that from Wordworth's piece is "This City now doth like a garment wear" and from Hopkins' is "For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow". This is the only literary device they have in common. Pied Beauty also has Alliteration like "swift, slow; sweet; sour", I would say this is unity-in-diversity alliteration because they sound the same but are completly different things showing how far...
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