Pied Beauty

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Pied Beauty

The poem "Pied Beauty" begins by praising God for all the colorful and diverse things in nature. The speaker is thankful for everything with dots, circles, different colors, etc. He seems to be fond of nature and "the great outdoors." Many of the images in the poem made me think of camping out, or a picnic. For example, fresh fire-coal, chestnut falls, finches, skies of two colors, cows, etc. But the poem does not only speak of natures' diversity. It also makes reference to manmade things. For example, man's trades, tackle, and trim are also varied. The landscape plotted and pieced. The poem goes on to thank God for more things. Everything that is different, everything that is changing, everything that has dots, etc. At the end of the poem, the speaker says, "He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change." I had trouble with this line, because I did not know what the speaker meant by this. But after researching, and asking around, I came to the conclusion that it means that God, who creates change, is unchanging himself. While the beauty of the earth lies in its change, and it's diversity… the beauty of God is unchanging and timeless. So there is a bit of irony at the end.

This poem seems to have no setting. However, it uses a lot of images that made me think of being outdoors, camping, on a picnic, or looking up at the sky. The poem also has a joyful tone. It also has a little religious insight. It is almost like a prayer, in that the poem gives praise to God, and celebrates his creations.

There is much alliteration in this poem. In the second line, the "C" sound is repeated where the speaker says "of couple-color as a brinded cow." In the fourth line, the "F" sound is repeated. This line reads, "Fresh fire-coal chestnut falls; finches wings." I think this use of alliteration helps to emphasize the freshness of nature. The "F" combined with the...
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