Picture of Dorian Gray Repport

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Book Report - The Picture of Dorian Gray

You have to suffer for beauty. That is the saying. But does this suffering have a limit? Oscar wild touches this subjects in The Picture of Dorian gray. The book was first published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890. The magazine’s editors feared that the it was too indecent to submit, so they roughly censured 500 words.

The book covers many genres; Gothic fiction, comedy of manner, philosophical fiction, comedy of manners,Gothic fiction, has elements of the classic horror story The elements of gothic fiction is seen in the Supernatural and inexplicable events. The faustian concept that is held in the picture is not something that would occur in real life. The whole book takes its starting point in the supernatural object. Another sign of gothic fiction is the atmosphere of Mystery. This is also at place due to the supernatural element. But the mystique is also provoked by the murder of Basil Hallward that is kept a secret for a long period of time. Also the high emotions that takes place throughout the book, stir the atmosphere. Especially the reaction of Sibyl Vane is fiery. Oscar Wild is known a great writer of comedies of manner, and The Picture of Dorian Gray is not an exception. The society and the question of manner are presented in a highly satirized way; “It is a sad thing to think of, but there is no doubt that genius lasts longer than beauty. That accounts for the fact that we all take such pains to over-educate ourselves. In the wild struggle for existence, we want to have something that endures, and so we fill our minds with rubbish and facts, in the silly hope of keeping our place. The thoroughly well-informed man--that is the modern ideal. And the mind of the thoroughly well-informed man is a dreadful thing. It is like a bric-a-brac shop, all monsters and dust, with everything priced above its proper value.” (Chapter 1)

Here Oscar Wild forms straight critique of the...
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