Phyllis Rose, Tools of Torture

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Gaston Havandjian
Professor Hubbell
English Comp I
Essay Four
11/13/12

Human Nature: Another Tool For Torture?

Driving your car to a dinner with friends you go by hundreds of advertisement slogans at the side of the road. Reading them seems to be a good way to entertain your mind with all those miles ahead and since you didn't decide what are you going to order yet you think that maybe some of them will give you an idea. One of them captures your attention in a special way, it shows the image of a laughing sheep and below it says: “Meat is real food”. Eureka! Now you have a guess of what your order will be, but as long as you keep thinking in this phrase you wonder what they meant with the word “real”. If they are stating such a thing it means that they also believe that there is other food that is not real or not as real as meat. A second thought crosses your mind when you remember a column you read in the newspaper a few days ago which was titled as followed: “Studies have found that the consumption of meat and animal products increase the development of chronic diseases including high blood pressure, diabetes, coronary heart disease, obesity, kidney failure, osteoporosis and cancer”.

What if the advertisement was aimed to convince us that meat is good for you when it's actually not? What if after those studies were revealed the owners of the meat industry felt their businesses threatened and ignoring the facts are still poisoning our bodies and killing thousands of animals a day just for a profit? Vegetables, fruits and grains are not real enough and healthier perhaps?

When you arrive to the restaurant you bring up the theme and one of your friends provides a fact which supports the studies credibility, and from your point of view, it gives the whole discussion a clear ending. He tells you something you didn't know, that health insurance companies offer discount rates to vegetarians and vegans.

Every company's goal is to make money. Insurance companies determine a person’s risk of death by analyzing his habits and based on these results they charge a fee. In today's world, where money is more powerful than any religion, government or social institution, there is no better evidence than this to prove that the ingestion of meat is actually not good for humans. For hundreds of years we have been persuaded of the opposite and still are. What about the people working in the slaughter houses, what would they do if they knew that the blood they spill every day is contributing to reduce our life expectation?

Animals are not just being killed for food; they are also being used for the manufacture of products such as milk, cheese, eggs and many other more. Clothing, sport hunting and fishing, entertainment (Circuses, zoos and aquariums) and product experimentation are other examples of how animals are exploited for the “benefit” of man. The conditions were these creatures live are detrimental. Cages and chains, metal and fire, artificial breeding and separation from their cubs, a life of captivity and a slow and painful death are just a few examples of how they live a life of torture and agony until the day they become a steak on your table or a coat to provide warmth.

So, what moves a person to desire working in a place where killing becomes a routine and suffering and fear is perceived by every single sense? Of course that making a living and the lack of jobs would be one of the reasonable answers, but there should be something else that pushes someone to do such terrible things to these innocent living beings unable to even defend or speak for themselves. Is it something ingrained in our “human nature” or perhaps external agents, such as institutions and industries, convince them that they are working for a great goal?

In order to answer these questions we are going to use some ideas taken from a text written by Phyllis Rose titled “Tools of...
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