Phineas Gage Paper

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Running head: PHINEAS GAGE PAPER

Phineas Gage Paper
Javier Morgan
University of Phoenix
Cognitive Psychology
Psy/360
Dametrius Byno
August 28, 2010

Phineas Gage Paper
The brains role in cognitive functions is huge because it is the central processing center for all the actions that we do. The brain is the key to cognitive functions because it controls the different types of cognitive functions such as perception, attention, emotion, planning and action, learning and memory, thinking, language and all other aspects of cognition all take place in the brain this according to the researchers at The Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC). With the brain being able to control so many different types of cognitive functions many researchers wondered what specific parts of the brain controlled the different types of functions. Cognitive psychologist wanted to know how the brain functions controlled the different types of behavior that people exhibited. So there were to aspects that had to be understood about the cognitive function of the brain and it was how it controls the different types of cognitive functions and behaviors of a person. That leads us to the curious case of Phineas Gage, the railroad foreman that got struck in the head by a crowbar. It went through the frontal lobe of the brain and people were astounded that he lived. What researchers saw was an opportunity to study the brain and to see how different regions of the brain affected behavior and mental ability. The brain is a spectacular structure that can do many functions at one time. That is why it is important to understand how the brain controls the different types of functions because researchers want to know how these functions work will in some people and why it doesn’t work well in others. Understanding the structure of the brain and what parts specifically control each function is important to understanding the cognitive disorders that do...
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