Philippines Flooding Report

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Philippines Flooding

A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land that is not normally covered in water. Flooding can be a result of excess water flowing into a river or lake, leading it overflow and causing the water to spill onto the surrounding land. Flooding in the Philippines is relatively frequent because there can be up to 20 major tropical storms during the wet season every year, many of which are deadly. In August of 2012, Manila faced their worst flooding since Typhoon Ketsana in 2009. Flooding can be caused by several different reasons, but these causes can usually be broken into two very contrasting categories—natural or human made.

During this 2012 flood the Natural Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council reported that 2.11 million people had been affected by the monsoon. The Watchers news site reported that more than a “normal month’s worth of rain was dumped on the city in 48 hours”. The natural disaster that left 80% of Manila covered in water was intensified by the result of poor planning for monsoon season; hence there is a seemingly large impact from human causes. Neglected drainage systems and damaged watersheds allowed for the large city to stand more vulnerable to huge floods. Many squatters frequently build and live in shantytowns on storm drains, canals, and riverbanks. These squatters often dump garbage and this blocks the flow in the waterways. With the steady increase in numbers of squatters living and occupying danger zones it is inevitable that many people are in danger and are living at high risk. Because of the lack of planning and the state of the drainage system, the Philippines are very unprepared for flooding. Another leading factor that spurs flooding in Manila would be the deforestation happening on the outskirts of the city in order to build more housing units for the middle and upper class, according to Paulo Alcazaren, an architect.

This flooding in the Philippines actually began at the...
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