Philippine Social and Political Issues

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  • Topic: Philippines, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, Abu Sayyaf
  • Pages : 10 (3246 words )
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  • Published : December 13, 2012
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ABSTRACT

Political and Social Apathy, there are two faces of apathy. The first considers apathy as a choice and participation in public life a consequence of one's affirmative use of freedom. The second face of apathy arises when citizens are led to believe that their personal needs are not part of the political agenda, resulting into political deprivation and the reaffirmation of the status quo. Philippines political and social life is marked by the second kind of apathy, which might also arise from the belief that individuals are powerless and hopeless in making significant changes in their lives. For this reason, the paper would like to awaken reflection on apathy in the personal and public spheres and to outline ways by which the individual can move towards sympathy. It is the intention of this paper to show contemporary Filipinos can find his passion again in order to move out of apathy. The paper will explain the rationale behind the development of the Philippines social and political issues.

PHILIPPINES SOCIAL & POLITICAL ISSUES

1. POPULATION – RH BILL
2. DEATH PENALTY
3. LEGALIZING DIVORCE IN THE PHILIPPINES
4. PLAN TO ADD 2 MORE YEARS TO BASIC EDUCATION
5. POVERTY
6. ECONOMIC DEBT
7. CORRUPTION
8. INADEQUATE SCHOOL FACILITIES
9. HIT BY FISH KILL
10. TERRORISM
11. THE LIFE OF STREET CHILDREN
12. HUMAN TRAFFICKING

POPULATION – RH BILL
The Reproductive Health bills, popularly known as the RH bill, are Philippine bills aiming to guarantee universal access to methods and information on birth control and maternal care. The bills have become the center of a contentious national debate. There are presently two bills with the same goals: House Bill No. 4244 or An Act Providing for a Comprehensive Policy on Responsible Parenthood, Reproductive Health, and Population and Development, and For Other Purposes introduced by Albay 1st district Representative Edcel Lagman, and Senate Bill No. 2378 or An Act Providing For a National Policy on Reproductive Health and Population and Development introduced by Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago. While there is general agreement about its provisions on maternal and child health, there is great debate on its key proposal that the Filipino taxpayer and the private sector will fund and undertake widespread distribution of family planning devices such as birth control pills (BCPs) and IUDs, as the government continues to disseminate information on their use through all health care centers. Private companies and the public and private elementary and secondary school system will be required to participate in this information and product dissemination as a way of controlling the population of the Philippines. The bill is highly controversial, with experts, academics, religious institutions, and major political figures both supporting and opposing it, often criticizing the government and each other in the process. The issue is so divisive that at one point, the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines threatened to excommunicate the President, Benigno Aquino III if he supported the bill. DEATH PENALTY

With heinous crimes again filling the news this age-long debate is once more reawakened, with many sectors now urging the Aquino government to reintroduce the Death Penalty. As a bit of a background, it can be recalled that on April 15, 2006, the sentences of 1,230 death row inmates were commuted to life imprisonment, in what Amnesty International believes to be the largest ever commutation of death sentences. Capital punishment was subsequently re-abolished via Republic Act No. 9346, which was signed by then President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo on June 24, 2006. Today, Filipinos are more or less evenly divided about the death penalty, with many opposing it on religious grounds while some supporting it as a way of deterring crime....
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