Phil Legends

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LEGENDS

The Origin of the Hundred Islands in Alaminos City, Province of Pangasinan, Philippines

During the pre-Hispanic times, Rajah Masubeg, a brave rajah, ruled the peaceful and prosperous kingdom of Alaminos. His equally valiant son, Datu Mabiskeg, helped him oversee their kingdom. One day, an invading force was sighted heading straight for their island. A hundred of their brave warriors, led by Datu Mabiskeg, met the enemy. The battle was fierce and tragic. The enemy was completely decimated but so was the entire Alaminos force. However, a week after the battle, the people were surprised to see the seas off their shores flecked with small, verdant islets. The people believe that this was the gift of the gods: immortalizing the hundred warriors who gave up their lives for their home.

The Story about the Origin of Rice

In the olden days, famine gripped the land. The desperate people implored their goddess to save them. Moved by pity, the goddess descended to the earth. The land was parched with drought, with only a few hardy weeds on the ground. The goddess bared her bosom and squeezed milk into each barren ear of the weeds. When her milk runs out and she saw that there were still empty ears, she asked the heavens to give her more milk. But when she pressed her bosom again, only blood came out. When she was done, she then bent low over the plants and pleaded with them to flourish and feed her again. Weeks passed and the weeds grew and became heavy with grain. When the people harvested the stalks and pounded these open, some grains were as white as the goddess’ milk while some were are red as her blood. The people cooked these and found these nourishing. Rejoicing, for at last they have sustenance, they gave thanks to the goddess as they re-planted and harvested this weed which is what is now known as rice.

The Story about the Origin of the Firefly

There was once a young man who was as handsome as he was vain. He had the habit of derisively pointing out the physical defects of those around him. One day, on his way to the forest, he saw a maiden clothed in silk. He was struck by her beauty and thought that, certainly, this was the loveliest woman in the world. Entranced, he started to come near her, but she turned and fled. He combed the forest all day searching for her, but she was nowhere to be found. Finally, tired and irritated, he burst out aloud, “You are not really beautiful! Your nose is flat and your ears are too wide.” He then settled down against a tree and slept. He awoke with a start later to find the woman staring down at him. He also discovered that he had been transformed into an insect. The young woman, who was a fairy, told him that he would be cursed to remain thus until he finds a maiden who could exceed her in beauty. To this day, the enchanted young man continues his search, carrying a flickering light at night to help him in his quest.

The Legend of the Sky
When the earth was new, the sky was so low that people could hang things on it. They hung their combs, necklaces, cooking pots, dippers, and other tools on it. One day, a woman was cooking supper for her husband. He would soon return home from the fields. She cooked while her child lay in a hammock, which was hanging from the sky. While she was pounding some rice, the child began to cry. She tried to hurry her pounding, but the low-lying sky got in the way of her pestle and slowed down her work. In her irritation, she cried out, "I wish the sky were not so low so I could finish my pounding." They words were hardly out of her mouth when, with a great rushing sound, the sky began to rise. All the things hanging from the sky went up, too. Along with the pot and the fire went the baby in the hammock. From then on, the sky has remained very high. The pot and the fire became the sun, the comb became the moon, and “the man in the moon" is actually the woman's baby lying in its hammock. The necklace became the stars, and the dippers...
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