Pgce Theorists

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Humanist theorists tend to take a more holistic view of students and focuses on the student as a whole. There are quite a few learners who have suffered from fear of failure and rejection this type of experience and require support to change their attitude to learning. Petty (2009) states ‘Humanist psychologists believe that fear of failure and rejection produces maladjustment. Either learners play it safe and withdraw, feeling crushed and lacking in self-confidence as a result; or they hit out in retaliation, becoming disruptive’

Maslow identified a hierarchy of need; before learning can be achieved each stage needs to be met, often seen as a motivational hierarchy of needs. Basic needs such as food and shelter need to be met, followed by feeling safe and secure, belonging is the next stage once all of those have been met self esteem is aimed for where achievements can be aimed for and eventually to self actualisation where the main goal is fulfilled. Maslow explains human needs must be met before learning can take place, Reece and Walker (2009) confirm this be stating ‘If a student is tired, cold and hungry, then the quality of learning is reduced’.

Carl Rogers (1983) ‘developed the theory of facilitative learning. This is based upon the belief that people have natural eagerness to learn’ Gravells (2011).

Experiential learning is central to Rogers theory, he identifies four qualities; personal involvement; learner initiated; evaluated by learners and pervasive effects on learners. The highest level of learning needs involvement and input from the student and this can lead to change in behaviour.

The final session identified the role of the tutor was ensure the environment is considered safe and is comfortable for all students to feel part of a group and secure enough to contribute to the task and achieve learning.
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