Pest Analyses

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Somalia, Piracy, Piracy in Somalia
  • Pages : 11 (4033 words )
  • Download(s) : 39
  • Published : February 2, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
LITERATURE REVIEW.

There are so many definitions about piracy but international and customary treaty defines it as said by ademun odeke. (2011), Customary and international treaty laws define and classify piracy under four main categories. However, Somali piracy has risen numerous and hitherto unfamiliar issues. First, is the unique nature of the piracy; unlike anything known before and which has taken the international community by surprise. Second, are the unique underlying causes, outlined above? Thirdly, its detrimental consequences to international trade, maritime transport, maritime security and world peace? Finally, its bold challenges to established international law and existing world order calls for a review of the international position. Owing to the strategic location of its occurrence, Somali piracy has been catapulted to one of the major international crises of this decade, after the 2007 – 2009 global recession (the Credit Crunch) and international terrorism. Briefly, Somali piracy is not piracy in the ordinary sense of the word at all. It is a sophisticated internationally orchestrated business, employing equally organized international criminality. The shortcoming of those waging war against this mutant piracy is to employ methods designed against ordinary classical piracy of 300 – 400 years ago. Even this analysis is probably rather simplistic for such a complex problem. Although intended to provide a scenario of the piracy as understandable and mitigating reaction by some Somalis to events giving rise to the piracy, it might be misinterpreted as justifying the piracy. In the meantime something had to be done despite the continuing debate. Ademun Odeke. (2011).

Piracies have been in existence for a very long time now causing negative impacts to maritime trade. Somalia pirates are the most deadly and violent at sea and they operate, as said by Middleton (2008) alarming rate and threaten to drastically disrupt inter- national trade. It provides funds that feed the vicious war in Somalia and could potentially become a weapon of international terrorism or a cause of environmental disaster. For long piracy has been a problem mostly associated with the Malacca Straits between Indonesia and Malaysia, but it is now a growing issue for fragile African states. Up to 25 September 2008, the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) International Maritime Bureau (IMB) had recorded 61 actual and attempted hijacks. 2 In the last week of August 2008 alone four vessels were captured, and the year has seen Somali piracy rise up the news agenda, propelled by the capture of the Luxury yacht Le Ponant3 and the kidnap of a German couple that had been sailing their yacht through the Gulf of Aden. Since the end of 2007 piracy activity has shifted away from the Mogadishu port area and into the Gulf of Aden. The actual number of attacks could well be higher: not all incidents will have been reported as there is much illegal activity in Somali waters, and the official statistics do not measure the impact of piracy on Somali coastal trade. Some 16,000 ships a year pass through the Gulf of Aden, carrying oil from the Middle East and goods from Asia to Europe and North America. So one of the most important trade routes in the world is now threatened by the chronic instability in Somalia. Piracy has been a problem in Somali waters for at least ten years. However, the number of attempted andul outboard engines that can be pulled up onto the beach. These boats are fast and maneuverable but they lack the range necessary for richer pickings. Pirates now regularly use ‘mother ships’ to increase their range. The IMB recently put out a warning identifying potential mother ships.4 these are generally fishing trawlers that the pirates capture closer to shore and then use as staging posts for attacks further out to sea. Reports from a Yemeni fishing vessel that appears to have been used as a mother ship...
tracking img