Personality Types in Children

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 2540
  • Published : December 7, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Every Child Holds a Different Personality
Anyone who has had children or has lived in a family with one or more sibling(s), would know that even though children or siblings have very similar DNA, it does not mean that they carry the same personality traits. Children develop into the person they choose to become. Children will carry either a passive, aggressive, passive-aggressive or assertive type of personality. These three personality types can describe a child as highly sensitive, self-absorbed or defiant. Parents also play a role in a child’s personality, challenging them to become more pleasant and open minded people. They can also teach them to be respectful and trust-worthy by showing them right from wrong and the proper way to correct their mistakes.

A passive child is set off from the world. They believe that what they have to say does not matter, and allow their rights to be violated by failing to express their feelings. Passive children make little or no eye contact and speak in a low tone of voice. When asked questions they will often respond with, “I don’t know”, “Whatever you think”, “ I don’t care” , “ It doesn’t matter to me”…etc. A passive child is said, “To live in their own world.” They are difficult to excite and show little interest in things around them. Their facial expressions are often dull and in a class room setting they often have a difficult time staying on task (which is usually diagnosed as A.D.D.)

An aggressive child is always right. They will protect themselves at the expense of others (not caring about another child’s feelings). As an aggressive child he/she wants to win at all costs, and never want to be told what he/she has done wrong. The child grows up thinking that he/she will always have his/her way. Aggressive children are loud and often belittling to others. They are manipulative, controlling and often use physical and verbal abuse.

A passive-aggressive child fulfills their own rights initially then follows with...
tracking img