Personal Philosophy of Nursing

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Personal Philosophy of Nursing

Personal Philosophy of Nursing

Pamela Metzger

September 11, 2011

Jacksonville University

Personal Philosophy of Nursing

Nursing Philosophy

What is nursing, what does nursing mean to me? After much thought I have put together

a few ideas of what the term nursing means to me, along with some supporting ideas from

references I have read.

Jacksonville University School of Nursing Philosophy

One of the primary foundations of the philosophy of Jacksonville University’s School of

Nursing is based on caring in nursing. Compassion and concern for protecting and enhancing the

dignity of the patient are essential components of caring. Caring in nursing is there to meet the

needs of the patient, their family and their environment. The faculty of Jacksonville University

believes that caring can be fostered by education and then students put it to use in their

professional life. (Jacksonville University 2011)

Key Concepts/Guiding Principles

My personal philosophy of nursing consists of several key concepts and principles that

guide my actions as a nurse. As a nurse you must possess knowledge, you must be honest with

yourself and your patient, you must communicate well, you must be a voice for your patient

when they cannot, you must listen well, you must be able create a trusting relationship with your

patient and their family, and you must create a safe, clean environment to encourage the

wellbeing of your patient.

Nursing begins with a set of mechanical and critical thinking skills learned in school and

developed in clinical practice over a period of time and are used to aid in the recovery of the

patient. It is important to gain and utilize knowledge about disease processes and comorbidities

and how to care for that patient.

Personal Philosophy of Nursing

I believe, as nurses we do need to maintain a level of professionalism with our patients to

respect their dignity and give them a sense of trust that we know how to care for them and that

we are there to protect their safety and promote their wellness.

Trust and honesty in nursing are vital. Patients are in a vulnerable position in a hospital.

They have little or no independence, and little voice about what we, the medical staff, are doing

to them. I try to show my patient that I empathize and appreciate their vulnerability and I work

at not being mechanical in my nursing tasks. I try to connect with them and talk about a

common interest, a show they are watching on television, or a book they are reading. I try to

foster a trusting relationship by following through with requests. I find the patients are

more at ease if they know what to expect as a postop patient in the ICU. I explain about the

normal length of hospital stay after surgery, when to expect mediastinal tubes to be taken out, the

importance of ambulating in the hallways, and communicating their level of pain so they can

perform all of their tasks comfortably.

Nursing theorist Jean Watson says “caring is being vulnerable. If we are not able to be

vulnerable with ourselves and others, we become robotic, mechanical, detached and de-personal

in our lives and work and relationships” (Cara, C. 2003).

Nursing is also the act of caring about the individual; my concern about the circumstances

which led to their hospitalization and during their stay I provide them with the tools or education

to hopefully prevent or decrease further hospitalizations. When you are caring for someone, it is

not just about the patient in front of you, it is about their family and friends. Talking to my

patient about these important people in their lives gives them a little distraction from their

current situation. Patients will light up when talking about their children or their pets....
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