Personal Learning Stlyes

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Personal learning styles are highly complex and unique to specific individuals. It is often difficult to pinpoint an exact learning style. Though there are different categories, we often fine tune them to our own abilities. By examining our traits and tendencies we create a clearer understanding of how we process and learn information. With careful review, I have developed a specific analysis of my learning characteristics, including an evaluation of skill levels. Based on what I have recently learned and know from experience, I have also devised a structured plan for improvement of time management and study skills.

From a very young age, writing has been a passion of mine. Through writing I have developed an understanding of my personality and learning capabilities. One of the main components to my personal learning style is the necessity of writing. I have a strong need and urge to write everything down. While some students learn well in a lecture environment, extensive note taking is often required for me to retain any information. Written notes also correspond with the visualization and tactile elements of my learning abilities. Having something tangible at my disposure is the easiest way for my personality to respond to the material.

According to my score on the "Pathways to Learning" (Carter, Bishop, Kravits, 2002) assessment, I am highly developed in the Intrapersonal Intelligence. Both my written and visual tendencies, I believe, trace back to this underlying personality trait. As a child, I was extremely shy and very independent. Working in a group setting was completely undesirable for me; as I would much rather work on my own. With an introverted personality, I understand my need for independent thinking. I am only able to concentrate in quite, personalized settings because of easy distractions.

Similarly, organization is a key element to my unique learning style. After taking the "Personality Spectrum" (Carter, Bishop, Kravits, 2002)...
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