Personal Developement

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SHC 32
ENGAGE IN
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
IN HEALTH, SOCIAL CARE
OR CHILDREN’S AND
YOUNG PEOPLE’S SETTINGS

Index
3. Introduction 4. Duties and responsibilities of own role 5. Standards that influence job role 6. Professional standards 7. Reflect on own work activities 8. Personal development plan 9. Develop own knowledge, skills and understanding 10. Using learning opportunities and reflective practice to contribute to personal development 11. Recording progress in relation to personal development 12. Personal development plan 13. Useful websites:|

Introduction

Unit SHC 32 - Introduction to personal development in health, social care or children’s and young people’s settings. The unit is aimed at those working in a wide range of settings. It introduces personal development and reflective practice, and ways to implement them.

The workbook’s aim is to provide a proportion of the guided learning hours required for this unit. This is relative to patterns of delivery. Further support to the workbook ensuring sufficiency of evidence and consistency of your practice, could be; direct observation, witness testimonies, work products, APL - up to date certificate, professional discussion, candidate reflective accounts, questions, projects/ assignments, and case studies.

Some of the outcomes can be linked with other units.

There are five learning outcomes for this unit:
1. Understand what is required for competence in own work role 2. Reflect on own practice
3. Evaluate own performance
4. Agree a personal development plan
5. Using learning opportunities and reflective practice to contribute to personal development

(SHC 32.1.1)Duties and responsibilities of own role

Every care worker has a duty to act responsibly in their own role, maintaining expected standards of care. Complete the diagram below, using the circles to write in aspects of your role and responsibilities, your job description will help with this.

Standards that influence job role

The Code of Practice (GSCC) for Social Care Workers is a list of statements that describe professional conduct and practice required of care workers, one of which is to be accountable for the quality of work and take responsibility to maintain and improve knowledge and skills.

The Care Standards Act 2000 published by the Secretary of State informs the National Minimum Standards. They determine how services provided by the NHS, local authorities, and private companies or voluntary organisations, public and private sector should meet the needs and secure the welfare and social inclusion for people to use. These services are maintained at an acceptable level by measuring the quality of care by an independent regulator of health and adult social care in England, that is: The Care Quality Commission (CQC). They also protect the interests of people whose rights are restricted under the Mental Health Act.

They make sure that people get better care, by putting people first, championing their rights and acting swiftly to remedy bad practice. They make sure that the care that people receive meets Essential Standards of Quality and Safety, respecting their dignity and protecting their rights.

In order for the organisation where you are working to gain registration, it must meet National Minimum Standards. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectorate carries out inspections of all health and social care organisations (adults) and publishes reports of their findings.

This report is in the public domain and can be accessed by potential customers. The reports recognise good practice and also give indications of where improvements can be made, to help raise the quality of service provided. The CQC have 28 standard outcomes to measure the standards of practice, here are a few: Outcome 1: Respecting and involving people who use services

Outcome 7:...
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