Periodic Trends

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Periodic Table Trends
When you think of a periodic table, you think of elements like oxygen, neon, lead, and iron. You may even think of numbers, rows, and columns. You may not think about trends that are happening throughout a periodic table. There are many different trends that go on in a periodic table. The trends that I am going to be describing throughout this paper are atomic mass, atomic radius, first ionization energy, and electronegativity.

When you study a normal/ordinary periodic table, the atomic mass will usually get bigger when going left to right and it will also get bigger when you go top to bottom. The atomic mass gets bigger left to right and top to bottom because the protons, electrons, and neutrons are increasing making the mass get bigger as you movie along the periodic table.

When you look at the trends of the atomic radius, you will notice as you go left to right, the radius gets smaller and when you go top to bottom the radius gets bigger. The radius gets bigger going top to bottom because more energy levels are becoming occupied by electrons. The radius gets smaller going left to right because you are adding more protons which pulls the electrons and it makes it become unbalanced.

If you look at the trends of the first ionization energy trends on a periodic table, you will notice that as you go left to right it gets bigger, and as you go top to bottom it gets smaller. This happens because as you go to the right, you gain more protons increasing the magnetic pull making it harder to lose electrons. As you go top to bottom it gets smaller because as you go down, the electrons are farther away from the nucleus, which requires less energy than an element that has electrons closer to the nucleus. For example, Li is smaller than Cs. So if you try to take an electron from Li it will require more energy because this atom is smaller and the electrons are closer to the nucleus.

When you look at a periodic table you will notice the...
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