Peregrine Falcon

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Peregrine Falcon

By | October 2011
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The Peregrine Falcon

Common Name: Peregrine Falcon Binomial Name: Falco Perefrinus, (Latin for “Wandering Falcon”)

The Peregrines Major threats were reproductive failure due to the nation widespread use of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides (DDT). It can travel through the food chain from prey to predator, becoming more intensive at each food chain level. Since the ban of the use of DDT during the early 70’s, ( thanks with the help of Rachel Carson’s awareness book “Silent Spring”, of the harmful effects of pesticide use ), The Peregrine Falcon’s population is making a recovery. Numerous releasement into the wild and protection of nesting places have been effect all around the world.

 The Peregrine Falcon has a wide variety of habitats from the tropics to the desert and from sea level to 12,000 feet. It is found in almost every continent except Antarctica. They usually nest near water off of ledges or high cliffs. They don't usually build nests but rather dig a hole in soil and lay their eggs into. Peregrines lay 3-4 eggs that are preserved for 34 days. The newborn falcon's take flight 5-6 weeks after hatching.  

 
Adult Peregrines are usually medium sized to large, Blue-Grey-Black, with white under parts, short tail and long pointed wings. Body weight varies for female from 2lb-3.3lb, and for males 0.97lb-2lb. Its body length reaches 34-38cm, with a wingspan of 80-120cm. For younger Peregrine its colors are usually brown-black and a white-cream underside. The peregrine falcon is noted for its fast speed that reaches over 320km/h, making it the fastest existing member of the animal kingdom.  

 Many captive and releasement groups have gone through effect throughout the United States and Canada. There have been over 6,000 falcons released into the wild in a period of 25 years. The Peregrine Falcons are...