Perception of Belonging

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 379
  • Published : February 16, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
An individual’s perceptions of belonging evolve in response to the passage of time and interaction with their world. In what ways is this view of belonging represented in your prescribed text and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing? – Moria Perenise An individual’s perceptions of belonging evolve in response to the passage of time and interaction with their world. In today’s society we are known for adopting the latest trends when seen, trying to fit in by changing our identities and falling into traps were we think we belong when really we don’t. There are numerous perceptions that we as individuals perceive belonging to be. They connect you with other people and their experiences; determine your status within society and may even create an identity of the individual. Peter Skrzynecki, the author of “Felix Skrzynecki”, “St Patricks College” and “10 Mary Street” all portray various perceptions of belonging but focus more so on “not belonging” in greater detail. Felix Skrzynecki is an example of how the adoption of a new culture and trying to belong to theirs, can lead to the extinction of your own. St Patricks College displays that by forcing someone into a place where they feel awkward and secluded in can lead to a loss of interest, a loss of identity and the sense of belonging. 10 Mary Street showcases a community that belong within their own cultural group but are separated from the rest of society. It also explores the challenges and seclusion that immigrants experience when settling into a new country. Peter Skrzynecki uses various poetic techniques such as emotive language, metaphors, similes, rhetorical questions and imagery. Recently, Australia has released a new TV series show that is called “Redfern Now.” Episode 4, titled “Stand Up” is the related text that not only displays not belonging but emphasises just how much of a difference time and your surroundings can affect your sense of belonging. This can be seen through the dialogue spoken and the camera shots and angels that have been used. Belonging to everyday life is always challenging, no matter whom the individual may be, your sense of belonging heavily rely on your reaction throughout time and the interaction with the world. There is often a generation gap between younger immigrants and older generations once they settle in Australia. Elders might work outside the home, but are usually more isolated. Felix Skrzynecki, the father of Peter unfortunately does not belong in the Australian culture. Peter’s adoption of the Australian culture has left his father disadvantaged and a sense of detachment. Felix home is the garden, where he walks “ten times around the world.” This hyperbole creates a sense of belonging in this setting, as he chooses to stay within its boundaries. His experience of displacement after the war has led to his chosen state of positive isolation in a secure place that he can control. Felix has an organic sense of belonging associated with the soil or the land, very little with the rest of the Australian people. Young people generally speak English more quickly and fluently while elders often struggle to learn a new language. “Did your father ever attempt to learn English?” The father represents an alienation experienced by an older migrant, while the son experiences the gradual integration into a new society. The disconnection between father and son comes from the latter’s inability to retain his Polish heritage fully. He cannot relate to the Polish friends, with their violent handshakes, their formal address, their reminiscing about farming in Poland; he even begins to forget some Polish words, much to his father’s dismay. The poet and the father are resigned that the son will integrate and assimilate with the Australian culture and traditions. The father, like a “dumb prophet” allows the son to put down his roots – “pegging my tents/Further and further south of Hadrian’s Wall”. This wall symbolises the barrier...
tracking img