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Pennies In The Woods

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Pennies in the Woods In Annie Dillard's essay "Seeing" she delves deeply into the smaller points of life. She talks of how seeing things isn't always enough, and how one needs to look deeper at what is going on around them, especially in nature. Nature plays a big part in Dillard's journey into enlightenment, for her it metaphorically represents real life. Dillard uses a formula of sorts to express what she is really trying to say, however, the true meaning of her lengthy metaphors is often hard to decipher. This formula is very simple, first she presents an image, then she offers the reader a theme to go along with the image, the third part; on the other hand, is the hardest, the reader has to figure out what Dillard is really describing when you figure out the image and the theme. If; however, you read closely enough, you can extract what she is trying to depict. There were two major concepts that stood out to me: first was the hiding of the pennies, and second was Tinker Creek. These two themes are what Dillard uses mainly in this essay, and they contribute to the formula that Dillard uses to express herself.

Dillard says, "When I was six or seven years old, growing up in Pittsburgh, I used to take a precious penny of my own and hide it for someone else to find" (81). She uses this practice as a sort of gift to the world. This metaphor is meant to depict the way we should go through life. The penny is a gift that she gives with out any retribution at all, ""¦ I would go straight home and not give the matter another thought, until, some months later, I would be gripped again by the impulse to hide another penny" (Dillard 82). She impressing on the reader that if we give something of ourselves then our lives will be enriched and more wholesome. Dillard mentions that it is a sad state for a man to be in when he is too fatigued to bend down and reach for a mere penny, but how it could be a joyous occasion to gaze down and see a shiny penny on the ground, a...