Penetrating and Blunt Abdominal Trauma

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  • Topic: Medical emergencies, Wound, Injuries
  • Pages : 4 (1245 words )
  • Download(s) : 182
  • Published : July 24, 2011
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‘Penetrating and blunt abdominal trauma’ is an article published in Critical Care Nursing Quarterly in the January to March, 2005 issue, written by Kristine L. Eckert. In this article, Kristine Eckert provides an overview of abdominal trauma related to penetrating and blunt mechanisms of injury. There are different case studies provided to illustrate interventions and treatments of different types of trauma. This article also provides an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the different organ systems, with complications being briefly discussed. Summary of Article

The abdomen is divided anatomically into the peritoneal space, the retroperitoneal space, and the pelvis. There are both solid and hollow organs in these areas. Trauma to any of these areas in the abdomen can lead to complications including hemorrhage, shock, peritonitis, and sepsis. ”Before considering a bowel injury, the patient’s respiratory, hemodynamic, and neurologic status should be evaluated because of a much greater immediate threat to life from these systems rather than a delay in bowel injury” (Eckert, 2005, p. 50). The differences between penetrating and blunt abdominal trauma and their threat to life are further illustrated in the four case studies discussed in this article.

The first two case studies considered penetrating abdominal traumas. In the first case study, a male patient sustains gunshot wounds to his chest, back, and leg. With the gunshot wound, he suffers hemothorax, injuries to his lungs, bilateral kidney, diaphragm, liver and small bowel, laceration of spleen, and tear to the distal end of his esophagus. The second case involves a male victim of a drive-by shooting with two gunshots wound to the right buttock and left lateral thigh. This type of gunshot wound is considered of the transabdominal nature, and the patient is a candidate for immediate surgery; computed tomography (CT) scanning was not completed prior to entry to...
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