Peloponnesian War

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Causes and major events of Peloponnesian War
Let’s remember the earlier events. In the years when there was Persian war, conflict between Athens and Sparta seemed not so strong, Themistocles, whom the ancient historians considered as a talented politician, and person who could foresee events begins to build walls around the city. During the struggle between Greeks and Persians (457 - 446 BC.) two most powerful states in Greece had a desire to dominate and as the result they had military clashes. Peloponnesian War was the result of increasing controversy. The roots of the Peloponnesian War can be traced back to many specific instances but on the most part three main elements caused its rise; Sparta's anger at Athenian aid to Spartan enemies, Spartan fear of Athenian power, and the hostility and mistrust caused by the radical differences between the two societies. The Peloponnesian War was inevitable. Clearly Sparta and Athens functioned under opposite philosophies. Two cities were not even one hundred and fifty miles apart, but were distinctly opposite. While they were related by origin, worshiped the same God, and spoke the same language they were radically different in their ways of living and thinking Seeing the power in navy, Pericles ( a prominent and influential statesman, orator, and general of Athens during the city's Golden Age—specifically, the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars) was preparing a policy to armed conflict. By the way the most successful operations in Peloponnesian War are associated with actions of navy. Of course, in addition to political reasons there was economically – Corinth’s trade contest. ( Corinth city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece) Before the war Athenian fleet numbered 300 vessels, Peloponnesians had just half of this number, but there was predominance in the Army - 60 thousand soldiers, the Athenians only 30 thousand....
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