Pedagogy of Project Based Learning

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The Pedagogy of Project Based Learning
As a rather recent alumnus of secondary schooling, I can vividly recall the frustration I incurred sitting in a classroom being “spoon-fed” information, knowing the minute the bell rang, most of the information that was being forced into my brain would be left in the classroom. I have always felt that, for the most part, being injected with lectures, hand-outs, independent studies and tests based on what I was “taught” four months prior was simply not conducive to thinking and learning. It was however, conducive to the regurgitation of information that would render itself quite useless in real world applications. It is however not to say, that sitting in an English class was unbeneficial. I am aware that without those credits, writing this essay would be the end of me. Lectures and the absence of imagination have their place in curriculum. What I am saying is that I can recall working in my wood shop class ten times over recalling what X is equal to.

I believe that form of educational model is simply inadequate when it comes to providing high school students with the challenges, methods, exercises and approaches that can help them use their aptitude in critical ways. Project Based Learning helps students to question and evaluate information. Students will need to know how to solve everyday problems more often than they will be required to recite a Shakespeare sonnet, when it comes to real world application.

Let me, if you will, pose some questions.
Did school ever teach you how to verify, question or even challenge the information being spoon fed into your brain?
Did school show you how to best organize your work while in a collaborative team? Did high school ever present information in effective ways so that complicated and convoluted ideas can be communicated easily to others?

My answer to all of the questions posed is a boisterous "no".

In today's traditional classrooms, students...
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