Pda Rehabilitation Management System, Project

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Contents
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY4
PROJECT TITLE4
BACKGROUND4
Rationale8
Tangible Benefit8
Intangible Benefits9
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES10
CORE10
ENHANCEMENT10
SPECIAL10
JUSTIFICATON FOR THE RESEACH11
METHODOLOGY11
CONCLUSION12
CHAPTER 2: LITERATURE REVIEW.13
DOMAIN RESEARCH13
Review of Past Research Works and Identification of Gaps14
WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES16
WHY WE NEED WIRELESS NETWORK16
COMPARISON BETWEEN WIRELESS STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGIES17
COMPARISON BETWEEN BLUETOOTH AND WIFI17
PERSONAL DIGITAL ASSISTANCE (PDAs)19
INTRANET20
COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL21
TCP/IP IN CLIENT/SERVER MODEL21
CLIENT/SERVER ARCHITECTURE21
Data Synchronization22
ELECTRONIC MAILS (E-MAIL)26
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)26
MOBILE PRINTING27
MONITORING IP ADDRESS28
TECHNICAL RESEARCH29
LANGUAGE29
C sharp (C#)29
DATABASE31
Proposed Database31
Microsoft SQL Server 200531
Oracle Database 10g31
Justification for chosen System Database32
METHODOLOGY34
What is need for a Methodology?34
Comparison of Methodologies34
Rational Unified Process (RUP)34
Advantages of RUP:35
Disadvantages of RUP:36
Waterfall Model36
Advantages of Waterfall Model:37
Disadvantages of Waterfall Model:38
Spiral Methodology38
Advantages of the Spiral Model:39
Disadvantages of the Spiral Model:39
Critical Evaluation & Analysis for Project Methodologies39
Justification for the chosen Methodology - RUP41
CHAPTER 3: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY44
Research Approach44
Questionnaires44
Interview47
Chapter 4: PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA49
Introduction49
FINDING FROM QUESTIONNARES50
FINDING FROM INTERVIEW60
Conclusion61
CHAPTER 5: SYSTEM DESIGN62
Modeling Tools62
Justification for UML64
Use Case description64
Use Case Diagram for PDA-Rehabilitation Management System65 The Use Case Specification66
CHAPTE 6: CONCLUSSION74
References75
APPENDIX79


CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY
PROJECT TITLE
PDA-Rehabilitation Management System
BACKGROUND
According to (L. Leape, 2003) stated that every year, millions of sick and injured people go to hospitals, putting their trust in medical staff to do whatever is necessary to help them. While the majority of the patients received the level of help and care required, others were not so fortunate. In fact, hospital errors occur more frequently than generally known. Even worse, when they do occur, hospital errors can have devastating, potentially fatal, consequences. Medical error generated increase the attention to the issue of patient safety in the health care system. Among hospital inpatients, medications are a leading cause of adverse events, and errors involving medications are frequent. (Rosen-bloom, 2003) has mentioned in his article of medical error that medical dosage error continue to contribute heavily to thin ongoing health care crisis and cause high percentage of death every year. The reputation of the entire healthcare industry is at stake, as patient confidence continues to proportionately erode. After all fragile patient –doctor relationship is a bond of trust around which any healthcare system must revolve. There is potential for a hospital error at many stages of the patient’s hospital visit of stay. Everyone – from the first nurse to check a patient in, to the doctor, to the x-ray technician, to the surgeon, to the pharmacist, must be diligent about his or her work in order to ensure that patients have an error-free visit. Unfortunately, hospitals especially government hospital or local hospitals are often busy, short-staffed, and resources are often scarce. This creates an environment conductive to hospital errors. An erroneous medication use history may result in failure to detect drug-related problems as the cause of hospital admission or lead to interrupt or inappropriate drug therapy during hospitalization. Either occurrence may adversely affect patient safety. Following...
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