Paul Hardy

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 833
  • Published : October 18, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Paul Hardy’s case is a really intriguing dilemma. Hardy clearly meets Zaleznik’s definition of a compulsive employee: he has excessive doubts about his career and his future. He exhibits a reversal of attitude pattern: first he wanted a promotion , then he wished for an equivalent position and finally he wanted to know more about opportunities outside P&C. Moreover, by blaming Williams for his situation, Hardy was clearly refusing to accept responsibility for his own actions . Most importantly, he is a manipulative subordinate. Not only did he keep asking questions when Chorley was clearly uncomfortable with the situation but he also spiced things up when he started crying and effectively casted doubt on Chorley . Also, Hardy’s past behaviour as evidenced by the Coventry incident when he fouled his superiors twice is another clear sign of manipulation. On top of that, Hardy sent multiple medical notes to justify his stay at home due to depression, but was found playing cricket and achieving a good batting average for his village team. Although Hardy is a problematic analyst, he is clearly a victim of mismanagement. First, after 12 years spent at P&C, management should have noticed that Hardy is undoubtedly compulsive and needs clear objectives and guidelines, and close supervision to minimize his doubts. However, the fact that Hardy was not responsive to William’s numerous feedbacks shows that the duty of the latter as a direct supervisor was breached. What strikes me the most is that had Hardy not asked about a promotion, he would have continued to work on his project and he wouldn’t have known about his poor performance. Williams should have made more efforts to deliver effective feedback, find what truly stimulates Hardy and closely monitor his performance . Moreover, mismanagement was clearly manifested by P&C during Hardy’s initial transfer. Instead of effectively fixing the issue by constituting an adequate “record” of Hardy’s mistakes,...
tracking img