Patrick Graham Ire/Land Iii

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Patrick Graham “Ire/land III”
he painted in 1982 and was later bought by the Gallery that year; it is a oil on canvas (183x122cm). The painting it self is hung in the Irish political wing of the Hugh Lane Gallery. The painting is high in saturated colours, it is very vibrant and has very strong bold colours such as: oranges, greens, browns, blues, reds and yellows so it has a broad range of hues. Since the room this painting was hung in is very bright with artificial lights the painting stands out stronger against the white background (the wall) and since it is not in a glass frame you can clearly see straight away his use of impasto, this is were he layers the paint thickly straight on to the canvas. His use of Impasto can be seen almost emerging from the figure and spreading like a vine thought out the painting, down towards the shamrock and up out of the figure into the mass of colours in the top background. In splash of colour across the top of the painting are the colours if the Irish flag oranges, greens and white, the brush strokes look very disjoined, almost panicked with smoky edge’s which gives it quite a soft background with a very hares white foreground. These colours are very strong in comparison to the grey figure which lye’s flat across a tall black alter.

The painting appears to be full of geometric shapes which makes this painting symmetrical, with a rectangle with in a rectangle, it is divided up in to grids almost, with the stem of the shamrock creating a divider vertically between both half’s of the painting while the figure in the background creates another horizontal line through the painting as do the six figures in the foreground.

The centre rectangle is a large sinister, mostly black alter which takes up most of the painting. It appears to have dominance over all other elements of the painting. This avoids confusions and creates a kind of harmony with in the painting as all other aspects of the painting are either connected or...
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