Pathos, Ethos, and Logos in Beowulf's Appeal

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In Beowulf's appeal to Unferth, Beowulf uses Pathos when referring to his swimming match against Brecca. Beowulf makes the audience feel sympathetic for him when he uses vivid descriptions and has an emotional tone when he tells them of how he had to fight off sea-monsters and extremely harsh conditions. He also admits that he made a "mistake" in his challenge with Brecca. This also adds to the empathy that the audience was already feeling for him. Admitting that he made a mistake makes Beowulf's argument seem more credible and it makes him sound even more reasonable. His argument using pathos was very effective because he uses a pathetic appeal to manipulate and gain the support of the people.

Beowulf's also uses Ethos to help his appeal against Unferth. To begin his argument, Beowulf immediately discredits Unferth's attack on him by accusing him of being a drunk. This makes Unferth seem unethical and causes his evidence against Beowulf to seem weak and unconvincing. Beowulf also uses Ethos later on when he again uses a form of an ad homonym attack when he rebukes Unferth for murdering his brothers. This, again, attacks Unferth's principles and causes him to look dishonorable. Beowulf's argument using ethos was also very effective because through his attack of Unferth, he makes his audience feel like he does not intend them any harm and causes them to be more willing of everything that he has to say.

Beowulf's use of Logos is seen when he is trying to put together his case for fighting Grendel. His arguments using ethos and pathos were just support that helped him ultimately be able to use logic in his argument. Beowulf's humble boasting allowed him to use a logical, syllogistic response that made his argument completely credible and caused Hrothgar to believe Beowulf through his logical forms or reasoning that made him seem like the only one capable of defeating Grendel. His use of logos was just as effective as his arguments...
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