Pastoral Counseling

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PASTORAL COUNCELING

Melody Bragg

College Writing and Research 101

Mrs Pickett

December 16, 2008

Table of Contents

Introduction………………………………………………………………………..3

The Personal Interview With Pastor Corrie Warren………..……………………..5 The Interview Concerning a Specific Scenario…………………………………...6

Conclusion………………………………………………………………………...8

Work Sited………………………………………………………………………...9

Introduction

Pastoral counseling is a branch of counseling in which ordainded ministers, rabbis, priests and others provide therapy services. The therapists integrate modern psychological thought and method with traditional religious training.[1] All branches of the U.S. Armed services offer Pastoral Counseling to their members. Only 6 states license the title "Pastoral Counselor": Arkansas, Kentucky, Maine, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Tennessee. In many other states Pastoral Counselors may qualify for licensure as Marriage and Family Therapists or as Professional Counselors. Due to the United States Constitution and its principle of the separation of church and state, religious activities are not subject to regulation by the government to the extent secular businesses are regulated. Therefore, pastoral counseling is essentially a non-licensure track in the US. Most Pastoral Counselors will seek certification from an authorizing body and the covering of an established church to insure their religious nature is acknowledged and to prevent undue regulation from the state. Many states forbid prayer as a form of treatment by state licensed practitioners while most Pastoral Counselors will readily engage their subject in prayer. Most Pastoral Counselors do not accept assignment of their fees to insurance companies and instead encourage their clients submit requests for reimbursement. Pastoral counselors usually maintain the position that insurance belongs to the insured and that it is the responsibility of the insured to seek reimbursement of expenses. Insurance companies often will not pay for pastoral counseling by counselors without state licensing in addition to their pastoral licensing.

The past decade has been marked by a rapid expansion of counseling services, new attempts at definition and clarification of the term itself, reorientation of different professional groups with respect to their participation in counseling, the development of new methods and techniques, and finally the preoccupation of professional groups with matters of training standards. Perhaps the most important fact for persons interested in the field is the recent extension of counseling facilities and the consequent enlargement of employment opportunities. The most influential factor has been the entry of governmental agencies into this area of service as sponsors of large-scale operations. In particular, the Veterans Administration, the Federal and State Offices for Vocational Rehabilitation, and the Federal and State employment Services have either employed directly or have been responsible indirectly for the employment of thousands of persons bearing the title counselor. In addition, schools and colleges have appreciably expanded their staffs. Data are not available to afford a basis for judging whether or not the substantial increase in the number of counselors employed in business and industry has been maintained in the post-war years. Looking to the future, one trend seems apparent: rising professional standards. The period of mushroom growth has already come to a halt and the demand in the future probably will be of such a nature that only the professionally trained will be able to qualify for employment. Definitions of counseling always have varied. They have been couched in terms of aims and objectives, procedures, duties performed and similar categories. In recent years the tendency has been to amend the term by appending a modifier. Pepinsky (a) the diagnosis and treatment of minor (no embedded, no incapacitating,...
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