Parts of Speech

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  • Topic: Pronoun, Noun, Copula
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 | English Parts of SpeechThere are eight different English parts of speech, but before we continue any further...What is a Part of Speech?A part of speech is a group of words that are used in a certain way. For example, "run," "jump," and "be" are all used to describe actions/states. Therefore they belong to the VERBS group.

In other words, all words in the English language are divided into eight different categories. Each category has a different role/function in the sentence.

The English parts of speech are:
Nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections.

Same Word – Several Parts of SpeechIn the English language many words are used in more than one way. This means that a word can function as several different parts of speech.

For example, in the sentence "I would like a drink" the word "drink" is a noun. However, in the sentence "They drink too much" the word "drink" is a verb. So it all depends on the word's role in the sentence.

Nouns

A noun is a word that names a person, a place or a thing.

Examples:
Sarah, lady, cat, New York, Canada, room, school, football, reading.

Example sentences:
People like to go to the beach.
Emma passed the test.
My parents are traveling to Japan next month.

The word "noun" comes from the Latin word nomen which means "name," and nouns are indeed how we name people, places and things. Abstract NounsAn abstract noun is a noun that names an idea, not a physical thing.

Examples:
Hope, interest, love, peace, ability, success, knowledge, trouble. Concrete NounsA concrete noun is a noun that names a physical thing.

Examples:
Boy, table, floor, coffee, beach, king, rain, children, professor. Common NounsA common noun is a noun that names a general thing, not a specific thing.

Examples:
Boy, girl, city, country, company, planet, location, war.
Proper NounsA proper noun is a noun that indicates the specific name of a thing. It begins with a capital letter.

Examples:
Robin, Alice, London, Sweden, Google, Earth, Eiffel Tower, Civil War. (Compare these examples to ones in the "Common nouns" section to see the difference.) Countable NounsA countable noun is a noun that indicates something you could actually count.

For example, you could count cats: one cat, two cats, three cats... However, you couldn't count water: one water, two water – no, it doesn't work...

A countable noun has both a singular and a plural form, and it can be used with the indefinite articles (a/an).

Examples:
Window, teacher, tree, lion, eye, cloud, pencil, heart, movie. Uncountable NounsAn uncountable noun is a noun that indicates something you cannot count.

For example, you could count cats: one cat, two cats, three cats... However, you couldn't count water: one water, two water – no, it doesn't work...

An uncountable noun has only one form (no plural), and it cannot be used with the indefinite articles (a/an).

Examples:
Furniture, advice, mail, news, equipment, luggage, work, coffee, information.

Pronouns

A pronoun is a word that is used instead of a noun. For example, you could say "Lisa is a nice girl." Then you could replace the noun "Lisa" with the word "She" and get the following sentence: "She is a nice girl." "She" is a pronoun.

Examples:
I, he, it, we, them, us, mine, itself.

Example sentences:
He doesn't want go with them.
Would they help us?
His house is bigger than ours.
Who is she?

The word "pronoun" comes from "pro" (in the meaning of "substitute") + "noun." Personal PronounsPersonal pronouns represent people or things. The personal pronouns are: I, you, he, she, it, we, they, me, him, her, us, them. Demonstrative Pronouns"Demonstrative" means "showing, making something clear."

Demonstrative pronouns point to things. The demonstrative pronouns are: this, that, these, those.

Use "this" and "these" to talk about things that are near in space or in time. Use "that" and...
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