Participatory Culture –

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Participatory Culture –
Case Study- The Reporting on China’s High-Speed Train Crash 2011

Hui Liu
University of Nicosia

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for
Comm – 532 New Media: Aesthetics, Interactivity and Representation Instructor’s Name: Costas Constandinides
Fall 2011
Table of Contents

1 Introduction…………………………………………...….3

2 Literature Review………………………………………...3

3 Case Study - The Reporting on China’s high-speed
Train crash 2011…………………………………….…….5

4 Analysis...…………….……………………………………7

5 Conclusion………..……………………….………….......11

References…………..……………………………………….12

1 Introduction

In this paper, base on participatory cultural from Henry Jenkins to analysis a case – high-speed train crash event happened in china to show how the application of Jenkins’s theory is problematic which the internet for participatory cultural and political interaction in china that is or not as a sustainable alternative to government propaganda.

2 Literature Review
2.1.1 A definition of participatory culture

Henri Jenkins has become the foremost author on media convergence theory and the belief that through digital media participatory culture can be achieved better than through traditional means He cites the following reasons for that: “1. With relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement 2. With strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations with others 3. With some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices 4. Where members believe that their contributions matter

5. Where members feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least they care what other people think about what they have created). Not every member must contribute, but all must believe they are free to contribute when ready and that what they contribute will be appropriately valued.” (Henry Jenkins 2006, Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century, p7)

In theory, these are all very worthwhile goals, but practice is much more difficult and diverse than that. In my analysis, I will discuss a recent case from China and show how the application of Jenkins’ theory is problematic.

2.1.2 Forms of participatory culture and states

After giving his definition of participatory culture, he then goes on to describe how this culture could look. He writes the following: “Affiliations — memberships, formal and informal, in online communities centered around various forms of media, such as Friendster, FaceBook, message boards, metagaming, game clans, or MySpace). Expressions — producing new creative forms, such as digital sampling, skinning and modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction writing, zines, mash-ups). Collaborative Problem-solving — working together in teams, formal and informal, to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (such as through Wikipedia, alternative reality gaming, spoiling). Circulations — shaping the flow of media (such as podcasting, blogging)” (Henry Jenkins 2006, p.8)

2.1.3 The need for policy and pedagogical interventions

In order to achieve all of the things above, Jenkins then discusses ways of educating the public. This is not an easy thing to do, as there exist a number of grave hurdles and deficits. He names these as:

“The Participation Gap — the unequal access to the opportunities, experiences, skills, and knowledge that will prepare youth for full participation in the world of tomorrow. The Transparency Problem — the challenges young people face in learning to see clearly the ways that media shape perceptions of the world. The Ethics Challenge — the breakdown of traditional forms of professional training and socialization that might prepare young people for their increasingly public roles as media...
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