Parody vs Spoof

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Francisco, Karl Angelo G| 2012-79267
Ms. Louise Jashil Sonido| ENG 10 WFX3
Concept Paper: Parody
15 Oct 2012

“Parody vs Spoof”

People are often confused about the word or the concept of a “Parody”. They often thought that it is synonymous to a “Spoof” because they share the same features that are commonly misunderstood. But there’s a difference between the two; and this paper aims to redefine, disambiguate, and clear the concept of a “Parody” from the concept of a “Spoof”. This paper will explain the concept of a “Parody” in general, using music videos specifically from YouTube to have a concrete example of a “Parody” in order to have a firm grasp of the concept.

What is a “Parody”? According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, a “Parody” is: a literary or musical work in which the style of an author or work is closely imitated for comic effect or in ridicule; a feeble or ridiculous imitation. While according to Britannica Encyclopedia: In literature, parody is when a person closely imitates an author’s style or work in order to ridicule or to provide comic effects. The word comes from the Greek “Paroidia”, meaning "a song sung alongside another." Parody differs from burlesque by the depth of its technical penetration and from travesty, which treats dignified subjects in a trivial manner. True parody mercilessly exposes the tricks of manner and thought of its victim yet cannot be written without thoroughly appreciating the work that it ridicules.

Basically, a parody is an act of imitation of an original work by slightly altering its original style and content but still able to obviously show the original work in order to make the parody effective for the audience; its purpose is to critically ridicule, mock, and show the folly and absurdity of the original work through exaggerations and humor. It’s an implicit comment on the original work by showing his comments not by directly telling it in the parody. What appears serious in the original work...
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