Parents Magazine: A Review

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  • Topic: A Great Way to Care, Magazine, Child
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Assignment #2- Reviewing Parents Magazine
Casandra Clark
Practice Across People and Cultures
Donna Gordon
Thursday, November 24, 2011

Magazine Analysis:
In the 21st Century there are many ways of marketing, promoting an idea, opinion, or product. Commercials, events, workshops, and the internet are ways that information can be obtained by consumers, and it also gives people opportunities to be enlightened or object to other person’s views or ideas. In addition, magazines are a useful tool for an individual to gain insight on different topics from one product and explore opinions from many reliable individuals. This essay will explore three magazines all from the same publisher; Parents Magazine. The target audience for these magazines are designed around parents and parents to be, and also their child(s) development. We will explore what messages these magazines are conveying in regards to gender, sexuality, and life roles. In addition, how these messages may influence the development of children, youth and young adults within society. Common themes as well as one theme contained in all three magazines are explored, and discussing how these messages as a helping professional may impact the workplace in a positive and/or negative fashion. There is lots of information and ideas from a magazine such as Parents. Meal planning, behaviour modelling/correcting articles, bonding ideas and crafts ideas as well as ads that promote anything from beauty products, to sugary snacks are just some of the highlights you will find in a magazine such as the three that will be used for this essay. There are positive messages as well as mixed messages as to what the publisher is trying to convey to their audience. First let’s explore the most common theme that was found on all three front covers of Parents magazine. Controlling a child’s worst behaviour, 3 Golden Rules for Great Behaviour and No more Toddler Power Struggles were headlines found on the front cover (Parents Magazine, June, October, and September). What makes it interesting is to see the comparisons between all three authors who wrote the articles and explore what the impacts may be from it. Nancy Rones suggests that the 3 golden rules; talking to your child at eye level, explaining with short statements, setting limits and sticking to them are the core conditions that will shape healthy appropriate behaviour (Burt. June 2011 p.16). These messages are positive as it encourages parents to get down to the child’s level, and it also reinforces appropriate behavior by the parents setting limits with choices so the child feels that their opinion is important. The second article was written by Jacquline Burt suggests that it is the parents reaction to misbehaviour that shapes future reactions to experiences of frustration from their children (Burt. p.56 October 2011). For example instead of parents pestering their children Burt suggests parents change their behavior and talk calm and ignore their child’s outbursts (Burt. p.56 October 2011). Lastly this author wrote that validating discipline meaning explaining calmly the consequences and being consistent will help make a parents expectation clear and children are less likely to become upset ( Burt October 2011, p.56). This article suggests to parents that children’s behaviour is essentially based on their parent’s reactions to their behaviour. It does not suggest that reactions of crying, screaming and becoming frustrated are natural reactions and that this way of communicating could be used as a learning opportunity for parents to talk to their children about their feelings and emotions and how to cope better. Giving advice to parents suggesting to ignore a child’s outbursts could have a big impact on a child’s development; being made to feel that emotions and feelings should be ignored and not talked about. The last article No more toddler power struggles written by Nicole Kear suggests...
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