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presidency of the United States of America, chief executive[->0] office[->1] of the United States. In contrast to many countries with parliamentary forms of government, where the office of president[->2], or head of state[->3], is mainly ceremonial, in the United States the president[->4] is vested with great authority and is arguably the most powerful elected official in the world. The nation’s founders originally intended the presidency to be a narrowly restricted institution. They distrusted executive authority because their experience with colonial governors had taught them that executive power was inimical to liberty, because they felt betrayed by the actions of George III[->5], the king of Great Britain and Ireland, and because they considered a strong executive incompatible with the republicanism embraced in the Declaration of Independence[->6] (1776). Accordingly, their revolutionary state constitutions provided for only nominal executive branches, and the Articles of Confederation[->7] (1781–89), the first “national” constitution, established no executive branch. For coverage of the 2012 election, see United States Presidential Election of 2012[->8]. ·Images

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Duties of the office
The Constitution succinctly defines presidential functions, powers, and responsibilities. The president’s chief duty is to make sure that the laws are faithfully executed, and this duty is performed through an elaborate system of executive agencies that includes cabinet-level departments. Presidents appoint all cabinet[->122] heads and most other high-ranking officials of the executive branch of the federal government. They also nominate all judges of the federal judiciary, including the members of the Supreme Court[->123]. Their appointments to executive and judicial posts must be approved by a majority of the Senate[->124] (one of the two chambers of Congress[->125], the legislative branch of the federal government, the other being the House of Representatives[->126]). The Senate[->127] usually confirms these appointments, though it occasionally rejects a nominee to whom a majority of members have strong objections. The president is also the commander in chief of the country’s military and has unlimited authority to direct the movements of land, sea, and air forces. The president has the power to make treaties with foreign governments, though the Senate must approve such treaties by a two-thirds majority. Finally, the president has the power to approve or reject (veto[->128]) bills passed by Congress, though Congress can override the president’s veto by summoning a two-thirds majority in favour of the measure. Historical development

By the time the Constitutional Convention[->129] assembled in Philadelphia on May 25, 1787, wartime and postwar difficulties had convinced most of the delegates that an energetic national executive was necessary. They approached the problem warily, however, and a third of them favoured a proposal that would have allowed Congress to select multiple single-term executives, each of whom would...
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