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Factors influencing Chinese youth consumers’ acceptance of mobile marketing Tao (Tony) Gao, Fareena Sultan and Andrew J. Rohm
Marketing Group, College of Business Administration, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Abstract Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine factors affecting consumers’ acceptance of mobile marketing in China. Design/methodology/approach – The authors draw on technology acceptance and uses and gratifications theories to develop a conceptual model of antecedent factors (including risk acceptance related to the mobile platform and personal attachment related to mobile devices) and marketing-related and value-based mobile activity related to the acceptance of mobile marketing practice. The conceptual model is tested using data collected among Chinese youth consumers. Findings – The results confirm the importance of risk acceptance and personal attachment in influencing mobile marketing acceptance, and support the “priming” effect of regular mobile phone usage on orienting consumers toward accepting mobile marketing initiatives. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited to a specific sample of youth consumers in China. The findings illustrate the role of antecedent factors – including personal attachment and risk acceptance – related to acceptance of mobile marketing in the Chinese market and they emphasize the role of marketing-related and value-based mobile activity in mediating the relationships between antecedent factors and mobile marketing acceptance. Practical implications – The findings illustrate the importance of recognizing the drivers of, and obstacles to, mobile marketing acceptance. These factors included the likelihood of providing information, likelihood of accessing content, likelihood of sharing content, level of risk acceptance, and level of personal attachment to one’s mobile phone. Originality/value – The paper adds to the growing literature on Chinese youth consumers by examining their acceptance of mobile marketing. The study reveals several implications for theory and practice relating to the antecedents of mobile marketing acceptance among the youth consumer segment within China, a large and emerging market. Keywords Mobile communication systems, Marketing communications, Communication technologies, Young adults, China, Consumer behaviour, China Paper type Research paper

Introduction
Technology developments in mobile communications have begun to foster new platforms for brand-consumer interactions (Shankar and Malthouse, 2007; Sultan and Rohm, 2005). The Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) defines mobile marketing as “the use of wireless media as an integrated content delivery and direct response vehicle within a crossmedia or standalone marketing communications program” (MMA, 2006). Increasingly, brand managers view mobile devices as an attractive platform from which to interact with consumers through various forms of marketing communications, including location-based promotions and television-style advertising. The success of mobile information and communication devices such as Apple’s iPhone has focused attention towards the use of mobile devices for marketing communications. Furthermore, the current financial crisis across the globe has led to even greater expectations for growth in mobile advertising and marketing as companies turn to this The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at www.emeraldinsight.com/0736-3761.htm

medium to save advertising costs (Geng, 2009). In particular, attention is increasingly focused on mobile marketing in China, where, according to its Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, the number of mobile subscriptions has reached 719.8 million in September 2009 (National Bureau of Statistics of China, 2009). Specific consumer segments – such as the teen market – are using mobile phones increasingly as single-source communication devices (Sultan et al., 2009; Gong and Li, 2008;...
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