Panacetin

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Separating The Components of “Panacetin”

This experiment heavily relied on the crystallization and extraction techniques that were previously learned. Extraction was important during week one to ensure that the organic layer was separated from the aqueous layer. This step was crucial because the organic layer was used for evaporation and isolation to determine the unknown compound. Crystallization was also crucial in obtaining the unknown as well as the aspirin. If an excess amount of HCl acid was added, then the aspirin may not crystallize. Solubility was also crucial because if the 1.00g of Panacetin did not dissolve in the methylene chloride, then solution would not me immiscible and the organic layer would not separate from the aqueous layer. The original melting point of the unknown compound was 114-116 c. The melting point slightily increased to 115-118 after adding the acetanalide and significantly decreased to 109-112 after adding the pheacetin. If aspirin was insoluble in methylene chloride I would add Panacetin to methylene chloride. This would dissolve the unknown in the solution leaving aspirin and sucrose left in solid form. Next I would vacuum filter the sucrose and the aspirin from the unknown and methylene chloride solution. To obtain the unknown in solid form, I would evaporate the methylene chloride until the unknown begins to solidify. To,separate the aspirin and the sucrose, I would add water to the solids. The addition of water would allow sucrose to dissolve within the water and the aspirin will be left out. Then I would vacuum filter the aspirin from the water/sucrose solution, to obtain the solid aspirin. And finally I would evaporate the water from the water/sucrose solution to obtain pure solid sucrose. The diagram below depicts the technique above.
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