Pain Center Waiting

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  • Topic: Patient, Chronic pain, Pain
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  • Published : April 24, 2013
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Pain center waiting room design: An exploration of the relationship between pain, comfort and positive distraction. by Heather Draper

A Thesis Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science in Design

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Approved April 2012 by the Graduate Supervisory Committee: Diane Bender, Chair James Shraiky Gerri Lamb

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY May 2012

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UMI Number: 1508585

All rights reserved INFORMATION TO ALL USERS The quality of this reproduction is dependent on the quality of the copy submitted. In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion.

UMI 1508585

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Copyright 2012 by ProQuest LLC.

All rights reserved. This edition of the work is protected against unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code.

ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway P.O. Box 1346 Ann Arbor, MI 48106 - 1346

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ABSTRACT "Too often, people in pain are stuck in limbo. With no diagnosis there is no prognosis. They feel that without knowing what is wrong, there is no way to make it right" (Lewandowski, 2006, p. ix). Research has shown that environmental factors, such as views of nature, positive distractions and natural light can reduce anxiety and pain (Ulrich, 1984). Patients with chronic, painful diseases are often worried, anxious and tired. Doctor's appointments for those with a chronic pain diagnosis can be devastating (Gilron, Peter, Watson, Cahill, & Moulin, 2006). The research question explored in this study is: Does the layout, seating and elements of positive of pain and distress? This study utilized a mixed-method approach. A purposive sample of 39 individuals participated in the study. The study employed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Lewandowski Pain Scale (LPS) and a researcher developed Spatial Perception Instrument (SPI) rating the appearance and comfort of a pain center waiting room in a large metropolitan area. Results indicated that there were no significant correlations between pain, distress and the waiting room environment. It is intended that this study will provide a framework for future research in the area of chronic pain and distress in order to advance the understanding of research in the waiting area environment and the effect it may have on the patient. distraction in the pain center waiting room relate to the patients experience

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DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to my sister Crissa Draper Levin, the bravest, strongest most stoic person I know. Too bad she had to get hit by a truck in order for my inspiration to strike. No pun intended.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank Diane Bender PhD, my thesis chair for all her help and cracking the whip to keep me on top of the ball and off the ledge, James Shraiky for always reminding me to keep questioning and continue exploring, and Gerri Lamb, PhD for keeping me grounded and providing new light on the research. Lastly I’d like to thank Dr. David Rosenfeld, without whom my access to the hospital and guidance throughout the process wouldn’t have been possible. I am truly lucky to have assembled such an amazing team.

his endless support, on-going counseling and for never losing faith in my expensive adventure to return to graduate school. My mother dearest, Carol Draper who is the smartest, funniest most wonderful mother in the world (she did not tell me to say that). My fiancé, Kenneth Chapa for putting up with my psychotic stress and supporting me in every way. And lastly Crissa and Michael Levin, who still helped me despite the fact that my “science” was not to their liking.

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On a personal note, I’d like to thank my father, James Draper for

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