Paganism vs Christianity

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Pagan vs. Christian

The holy Catholic Religion had a drastic Christian like impact on the barbarian, Viking Pagans of the Anglo-Saxon Age in England (Elements of Literature 11). The Catholics evolved the aggressive Pagan Vikings into a peaceful society (Williams). Also, the Catholics substituted their warlike religion and after-life to a more holy and Christian like religion (Chaney 197-217). Along with the altering of the Pagan society and religion, the Catholics also transformed the Pagans dominant government style to a more civilized and unified one (Williams). The Pagans did not expect their society, religion, and government would be shifted to a Christian like style, but it did (Elements of Literature 11).

The calm Catholics transformed the brutal Pagan Vikings into a more civilized society (Williams). After the transformation the Pagan’s tribal like communities was changed to towns with Castles (Williams). Also the Pagan’s tradition of oral literature being told by the scop was changed to written language in which the monks wrote (Williams). The unimportance of women in the Pagan society was changed when Virgin Mary the patriot saint helped raise the status of women (Williams). Along changing the type of society the Pagans were accustomed to into a more modern one like the Catholics there was also a change in religious beliefs (Elements of Literature 11 ).

The Pagans believed in a warrior death and after-life while the Catholics believed in a holy peaceful religion, this was another alteration the Catholics made upon the Pagans (Chaney 197-217). The Pagans believed there was many gods and the best place to go after death was Valhalla while the Catholics believed in one God and Heaven was the best place after death (Chaney 197-217). The Catholics had an idol to live up to which was Jesus, the son of God, while the Pagans fought in battle to please Valkyries, whom was said to be the person who chose who died in battle (Chaney 197-217). The...
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