Paediatric Malaria

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  • Topic: Malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium
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  • Published : April 28, 2013
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CURRENT ADVANCES IN THE MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT OF PAEDIATRIC MALARIA SEMINAR PRESENTATION

BY

ONAH CLAIRE CHINONYE
MATRIC NUMBER: VUG/BIO/09/130

SUBMITTED TO

THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

VERITAS UNIVERSITY, ABUJA
(THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA)

IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE COURSE REQUIREMENT FOR BIO4221: SEMINAR

FEBRUARY 2013

CERTIFICATION
This is to certify that this seminar write up is an authentic work carried out by Onah Claire Chinonye under the supervision of Dr Effiom Okoi Enang (Ph.D.) in the Department of Biological Sciences, Veritas University, Abuja.

Onah Claire Chinonye ---------------------------------------------- (Name of Student) (Signature and Date).

Dr Effiom Okoi Enang ---------------------------------------------- (Name of Supervisor) (Signature and Date).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I acknowledge the immense contribution for the following people in making my seminar presentation a success. First and foremost, I am grateful to my supervisor Dr Effiom Okoi Enang for his prompt assistance and guide in making my seminar a reality in spite of his limited time at disposal and the vast work that needed to be carried out by him. My appreciation could be quite incomplete if I fail to acknowledge the ceaseless effort of my parents Mr & Mrs Fidelis Onah for their moral support.

ABSTRACT
Malaria is a potentially fatal blood disease caused by parasitic protozoans. Human malaria is caused by four species of Plasmodium namely, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, and Plasmodium malariae. But the most common in man is Plasmodium falciparum and it is dangerous not only because it digests the red blood cells haemoglobin, but also because it changes the adhesive properties of the cell it inhabits. Of recent, some methods have been devised to manage and treat malaria in children and they include the use of ACTs i.e. Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies. These drugs can be combined with artemisinin to prevent reoccurrence of the disease in children because when artemisinin is used alone, it leads to a high rate of disease reoccurrence.

TABLE OF CONTENT
CHAPTER 1
1.0 Introduction
1.1 Life cycle of the malaria parasite
1.2 Pathology

CHAPTER 2
2.0 Malaria in children (Paediatric malaria)
2.1 Clinical presentation
2.2 Diagnosis
2.3 Treatment and prevention of malaria in children

CHAPTER 3
3.0 Current advances in the treatment and management of paediatric malaria

CHAPTER 4
4.0 Conclusion
4.1 References

CHAPTER 1
1.0 INTRODUCTION.
Malaria is a potentially fatal blood disease caused by parasitic protozoans. These parasites are transmitted to human, animal, and other hosts by the Anopheles mosquito. Human malaria is caused by four species of Plasmodium namely, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, and Plasmodium malariae. But the most common in man is Plasmodium falciparum and it is dangerous not only because it digests the red blood cells haemoglobin, but also because it changes the adhesive properties of the cell it inhabits. This change in turn causes the cell to stick to the walls of blood vessels. It becomes especially dangerous when the infected blood cells stick to the capillaries in the brain, obstructing blood flow, a condition called cerebral malaria (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2001). Life Cycle of the Malaria Parasite.

The life cycle of the malaria parasite in a human or animal comprises two stages- an asexual phase occurring in humans and the sexual phase occurring in the mosquito. During the asexual phase, an infected female Anopheles mosquito transmits malaria sporozoites to a new human host. The sporozoites travel to the liver, where they invade...
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