Oxford House Review

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Review of Oxford House
An Oxford house is a house that provides a clean and sober living environment for men and women who are recovering from active drug and alcohol addiction and is any house which falls under the Oxford House model, conceived in 1975 by Paul Molloy, a former senate committee staff member and recovering alcoholic. An Oxford house provides a group living environment and an effective means of keeping people clean and sober. Statistics show that when a person is in early recovery it is important for that person to have access to an environment that is conducive to maintaining complete and total abstinence from drugs and/or alcohol. An Oxford House somewhat guarantees this based on its purpose and how it is run. There are three primary rules governing each Oxford House and violation of any of the three rules can result in immediate termination of the offending house member’s residence. The three rules are: 1) Do no use drugs or alcohol or partake in disruptive behavior 2) The House must be run democratically. Every member has an equal voice in all decisions on house matters. 3) Pay your Equal Expense Shared (or EES) and all fines.

An Oxford House provides many benefits to the recovering alcoholic or addict. It provides structure and allows members to learn how to be accountable and responsible to each other and to their communities and reintroduces its members to practicing essential life skills. Each house is run in much the same way that a normal house or residence is run, which contributes to its effectiveness. House finances are maintained, bills are paid in a timely manner, the house is kept clean by way of weekly house chores assigned to each house member, the property is kept clean and maintained and every effort is made to create and maintain a good relationship with neighbors and the community. This last is particularly important because many people can be apprehensive about having a group home filled with...
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