Overview of the Uk Transport System

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  • Topic: Rapid transit, Light rail, Rail transport
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  • Published : October 14, 2012
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OVERVIEW OF THE UK TRANSPORT SYSTEM
With an integrated system of airports, seaports, rail and road, businesses located in the UK can select the optimal method of moving people and freight between major cities and locations, both within the UK and internationally. The main advantages of the UK transport system include: o Excellent air links to locations all over the world from world-class international airports. o An advanced and comprehensive road system that links all locations throughout the UK. o A privatised rail network linking all locations across the UK and, through the Channel Tunnel, all locations in mainland Europe. o Over 100 seaports across the UK, handling the largest volume of seaport traffic in Europe.

- Private (Cars & Motorcycle)
Most people in UK travel by car. About 75% of households have at least one car. Motorcycling is popular in UK, both as a means of transport and as a pastime with over one million motorcyclists. A full motorcycle licence can be obtained at the age of 17 after passing a test.

- Public
1. Road
The UK has an advanced and comprehensive road transport system, with a total of 394,000 kilometres of roads. There are almost 3,600 kilometres of motorways, all of which are toll-free except for the M6 Toll adjacent to the M6 in Birmingham. Roads and motorways are UK's primary domestic transport routes. The roads are divided up between major and minor roads. a. Taxi & Cab

We can stop taxis in the street or hire them at a taxi rank. We can also book minicabs by telephoning their office. Taxis have a meter that works out the fare, which is based on how long a journey takes. Minicabs often do not have a meter and are sometimes cheaper. The most famous taxi has to be the black cabs taxi service in London. Black cabs, also known as hackney carriages or hackney cabs, with the "for hire" sign lit. b. Buses

Public transport in the UK is well developed with local bus services throughout the country. In Great Britain, bus services are generally privately owned. In Northern Ireland they are state-owned and operated by Translink. Discount fares are often available for young people, students and pensioners. • Decker

United Kingdom has single Decker and double Decker buses. The red double-decker buses in London have become a national symbol of England. Double-decker buses are in common use throughout the United Kingdom, and have been favoured over articulated buses by many operators because of the shorter length of double-deckers. We can find them in towns and cities. The main places a bus goes to are shown on the front of the bus. You pay the driver when you go in. On single-deckers you sometimes buy your ticket from a machine in the bus. Most London buses have a conductor who will come round and collect fares. One way of seeing cities major sight is on an open-top double-decker bus. Tickets are valid for 24 hours and allow unlimited ‘hop on/ hop off’ travel. • Coaches

Coaches travel longer distances, are more comfortable, have separate compartments for luggage and do not stop as frequently as Decker buses. We use coaches for travelling longer distances or for going on school outings. You must buy a ticket before boarding the buses, there are ticket machines at most bus stops/ stations. Bus routes are identified by numbers and sometimes letters. Buses display their number in large digits at the front, side, and rear of the bus. 2. Rail

The railway system of United Kingdom is the oldest in the world. The UK has the 18th largest railway network in the world and one of the busiest railways in Europe. a. Trams
Tram is a vehicle which runs on fixed rails and is designed to travel on streets, sharing road space with other traffic and pedestrians. Most tram systems are on reserved tracks (fully segregated alignments), with only short stretches of...
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