Outdone by the Woman

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Outsmarted By The Woman

Who would have ever thought that the great Sherlock Holmes would be wrong from time to time? Certainly not any fan of the series of stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle's A Scandal In Bohemia proves this to be untrue. A Scandal In Bohemia is a Sherlock Holmes story that is different from most others. This particular tale, contrary to many of the other Holmes stories, does not involve a crime. Even more unusual, Sherlock Holmes is not only wrong about his conclusions and deductions; he is actually outdone by a seemingly sweet and innocent woman named Irene Adler. Throughout the story, Arthur Conan Doyle uses many examples of foreshadowing as well as other literary devices to keep the reader guessing. Through the use of these devices, Mr. Doyle keeps the reader in suspense and always wanting more.

While reading the story for the first time, it is hard to pick up on some of the literary devices that Doyle uses. It is not until it is read over and perhaps over again that one can finally notice these hints that Doyle is giving the reader. An example of this would be the use of foreshadowing. Throughout the story, there are many instances in which Sir Arthur Doyle uses foreshadowing to forecast what is going to happen later in the story. The first appearance of foreshadowing occurred in the first line of the entire story. "To Holmes, she will always be the woman" (1). At first glimpse, one would most likely not understand the meaning of this. However, after reading a few times, the reader would realize that this woman, the woman, is given this title because of events that occur much later in the story. Another good example of foreshadowing occurs towards the end of the story, before the resolution is unveiled. "Irene Adler, as I will still call her, had hurried up the steps; but she stood at the top with her superb figure outlined against the lights of the hall, looking back into the street" (185). This quote...
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