Our Human Heritage: Courtship and Mating

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First, read “Our Human Heritage: Courtship and Mating” on pages 85-90 in your textbook, and view the first 11 video segments entitled Deepest Desires.

Then, answer the following questions to submit to your instructor:

Write a minimum of 3 paragraphs per question, and 3 paragraphs explaining relevance to you. In total, you should have 9 paragraphs

1. How do evolutionary psychologists explain male-female differences in courtship and sexuality?

Evolutionary psychologists explain male-female differences in courtship and sexuality by stating that “the sexes have evolved to differ profoundly in aggressiveness, dominance, and sexual strategies.” Wade and Travis. (2008). Psychology, Ninth Edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Publishing. Evolutionary psychologists have brought forth the idea that males and females need to perform in a way that will allow them to pass on their genes.

Studies conducted by evolutionary psychologist show that males are more violent and socially dominant than females. Due to the need to be certain that males are reproducing heirs, they are more sexually jealous and possessive than females. Males are much more inclined to be promiscuous than females. They tend to be more interested in the youth and beauty of a woman, rather than the older and much mature woman. Evolutionary psychologists believe that the reason males favor youthful woman this is due to the fact that youthful woman symbolize fertility.

Woman are less promiscuous than men. They seek commitment in relationships. When searching for a mate, woman are more likely to search for a male who has stable financial resources. Another qualification that a female seeks in a mate is his status. Woman are seeking men who have the ability to provide for both her and her offspring. Females are more dedicated to parenting, so they are more cautious when it comes to courtship and sexual relationships.

2. Do any of these differences apply to primates?...
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