Othello

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Brendan Barbato
Ms. Netcoh
English IV EEP
28 January 2013
Othello
Othello is one of William Shakespeare’s famous tragedies, which is an epic tale of a moor that is brought to Venice and serves as a general within the Italian army. Othello’s private life can be seen as more interesting than his life as a general, because of his marriage to Desdemona and all of those who try and ruin his relationship. Desdemona is the daughter of a wealthy lord, named Brabantio, who is a Venetian senator. The antagonist of the play, Iago, begins filling characters heads with thoughts and false ideas such as how Desdemona fell in love with Othello, because he was not given the position he desired within the army and Cassio was given the position. At the beginning of the play Brabantio is unaware that Desdemona and Othello have eloped and are going to get married, so he goes to Othello and accuses him of using magic to seduce Desdemona, but Desdemona says that she loves him and that there was no magic used. Iago’s desire for revenge, Othello’s Jealousy, and Roderigo’s obsession with Desdemona contribute towards and caused the tragic ending of Shakespeare’s Othello, conveying the message that appearance versus reality can lead to tragic and fatal happenings.

Out of all the characters in the play, Iago seems to bring to the worst emotions out of each affected character. Iago is extremely jealous of Cassio, because Cassio was given the positional rank within the army that he desired. Iago says “Off-caped to him; and, by the faith of man, I know my price, I am worth no worse a place” (I, i, 11-12). This quote shows how Iago is angered by not receiving the promotion, because he says he knows his “place” which is referring to his rank. Seeking revenge, Iago starts a rumor that Cassio is sleeping with Othello’s wife, Desdemona. Iago says “That Cassio loves her, I do well believe it. That she loves him, ‘tis apt and of great credit” (II, i, 308-309). This quote really shows how...
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