Osmosis Reprot

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OSMOSIS REPROT
Introduction:
Osmosis is the result of diffusion across a semi-permeable membrane. If two solutions of different concentration are separated by a semi-permeable membrane, then the solvent will tend to diffuse across the membrane from the less concentrated to the more concentrated solution. This process is called osmosis. This leads me to my question, how do different concentrations of sucrose affect the rate of osmosis? My hypothesis is if sucrose concentration increases in the selectively-permeable baggies then, the rate of osmosis will also increase. Materials and Method:

To conduct this experiment the materials needed are 3 different concentrated sucrose solutions, .25 M, .5 M, .75 M. It will also require 4 beakers containing water from the sink. 4 pieces of dialysis tubing along with 8 pieces of string. An electronic balance to weigh the solutions. Makers and labeling type to label the different solutions. Paper towels needed to dry off any excess water. This experiment should be conducted in a group of 3. Step 1. Fill four separate beakers three-fourths full with deionized water. Step 2. Label the beakers to identify each different sucrose concentration later on. Step 3. Fill up the four baggies each with a different sucrose concentration, and the final bag fill up with deionized water. Step 4. Tie the bags with the string and rinse off each bag with di-H20 to wash away any spilt sugar. Step 5. Weigh the solutions to determine the bag weight and then wait 35 minutes and repeat the weigh-in to get the final weight of the solutions. Results:

The initial weight gain was figured by weighing the baggie with the Sucrose solution before putting it into the beaker with the deionized water, and after the baggies were in the beaker of deionized water for 35 minutes, then the baggies were weighed again. After the initial weight and the final weight was done, the final weight was divided by the initial weight and multiplied by 100 to get percentage...
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